Found 3917 Hypotheses across 392 Pages (0.039 seconds)
  1. The presence of absence of morning sickness will be related to the presence of absence of food taboos and similarly for food cravings (72).Minturn, Leigh - The influence of diet on morning sickness: a cross-cultural study, 1984 - 0 Variables

    This article proposes that differences in diet may account for the presence or absence of morning sickness in a society. Data suggest that morning sickness is not a universal symptom of pregnancy, and there are significant differences in foods consumed where morning sickness does not occur, including more maize, fats, and vegetables.

    Related HypothesesCite
  2. The presence of absence of morning sickness will be correlated with the societal importance of women's work in the subsistence economy (72).Minturn, Leigh - The influence of diet on morning sickness: a cross-cultural study, 1984 - 0 Variables

    This article proposes that differences in diet may account for the presence or absence of morning sickness in a society. Data suggest that morning sickness is not a universal symptom of pregnancy, and there are significant differences in foods consumed where morning sickness does not occur, including more maize, fats, and vegetables.

    Related HypothesesCite
  3. Morning sickness will be negatively associated with the frequency of vegetable consumption (72).Minturn, Leigh - The influence of diet on morning sickness: a cross-cultural study, 1984 - 2 Variables

    This article proposes that differences in diet may account for the presence or absence of morning sickness in a society. Data suggest that morning sickness is not a universal symptom of pregnancy, and there are significant differences in foods consumed where morning sickness does not occur, including more maize, fats, and vegetables.

    Related HypothesesCite
  4. Morning sickness will be negatively associated with the frequency of fat consumption (72).Minturn, Leigh - The influence of diet on morning sickness: a cross-cultural study, 1984 - 2 Variables

    This article proposes that differences in diet may account for the presence or absence of morning sickness in a society. Data suggest that morning sickness is not a universal symptom of pregnancy, and there are significant differences in foods consumed where morning sickness does not occur, including more maize, fats, and vegetables.

    Related HypothesesCite
  5. Morning sickness will be negatively associated with eating maize as a staple food (72).Minturn, Leigh - The influence of diet on morning sickness: a cross-cultural study, 1984 - 2 Variables

    This article proposes that differences in diet may account for the presence or absence of morning sickness in a society. Data suggest that morning sickness is not a universal symptom of pregnancy, and there are significant differences in foods consumed where morning sickness does not occur, including more maize, fats, and vegetables.

    Related HypothesesCite
  6. People in societies without morning sickness will consume green vegetables and fat more frequently in than societies where morning sickness is present (74).Minturn, Leigh - The influence of diet on morning sickness: a cross-cultural study, 1984 - 0 Variables

    This article proposes that differences in diet may account for the presence or absence of morning sickness in a society. Data suggest that morning sickness is not a universal symptom of pregnancy, and there are significant differences in foods consumed where morning sickness does not occur, including more maize, fats, and vegetables.

    Related HypothesesCite
  7. Birth ceremonies are more common in societies that customarily practice infanticide than in societies that do not (p. 72-3).Minturn, Leigh - Infanticide as a terminal abortion procedure, 1982 - 2 Variables

    This study investigates the conceptual frameworks involved in infanticide. Authors first examine data on infanticide and birth ceremonies, particularly the timing of these events and the infant and adult involved in each. Authors also examine reasons for performing infanticide, including illegitimacy, unwanted children, and excess children, finding them similar to reasons for performing abortion. Population control and implications for children's and women's status are also discussed.

    Related HypothesesCite
  8. Infanticide occurs before the birth ceremony is performed (p. 72).Minturn, Leigh - Infanticide as a terminal abortion procedure, 1982 - 1 Variables

    This study investigates the conceptual frameworks involved in infanticide. Authors first examine data on infanticide and birth ceremonies, particularly the timing of these events and the infant and adult involved in each. Authors also examine reasons for performing infanticide, including illegitimacy, unwanted children, and excess children, finding them similar to reasons for performing abortion. Population control and implications for children's and women's status are also discussed.

    Related HypothesesCite
  9. Siestas are more likely to be present in cultures that have agricultural subsistence patterns (239).Barone, T. Lynne - Is the siesta an adaption to disease? A cross-cultural examination, 2000 - 3 Variables

    This study examines the variability of siestas across cultures and considers how factors including climate, subsistence type, and disease susceptability relate to the presence or absence of siestas. The author finds a significant relationship between siestas and the presence of malaria.

    Related HypothesesCite
  10. "The limited family [nuclear, stem and lineal] is found with complexity of economy, of stratification, and of settlement pattern; this type of family is associated with monogamous marriage and small family size" (304)Osmond, Marie W. - A cross-cultural analysis of family organization, 1969 - 6 Variables

    This study uses a multiple regression analysis to examine the relationship between society type and several variables of societal organization. Results suggest that limited family type is more likely to be found in complex societies.

    Related HypothesesCite