Found 4292 Hypotheses across 430 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. The presence of absence of morning sickness will be related to the presence of absence of food taboos and similarly for food cravings (72).Minturn, Leigh - The influence of diet on morning sickness: a cross-cultural study, 1984 - 0 Variables

    This article proposes that differences in diet may account for the presence or absence of morning sickness in a society. Data suggest that morning sickness is not a universal symptom of pregnancy, and there are significant differences in foods consumed where morning sickness does not occur, including more maize, fats, and vegetables.

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  2. The presence or absence of morning sickness will be associated with various societal variables, including type and intensity of agriculture, settlement pattern, and community size (72).Minturn, Leigh - The influence of diet on morning sickness: a cross-cultural study, 1984 - 0 Variables

    This article proposes that differences in diet may account for the presence or absence of morning sickness in a society. Data suggest that morning sickness is not a universal symptom of pregnancy, and there are significant differences in foods consumed where morning sickness does not occur, including more maize, fats, and vegetables.

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  3. Morning sickness will be negatively associated with the frequency of vegetable consumption (72).Minturn, Leigh - The influence of diet on morning sickness: a cross-cultural study, 1984 - 2 Variables

    This article proposes that differences in diet may account for the presence or absence of morning sickness in a society. Data suggest that morning sickness is not a universal symptom of pregnancy, and there are significant differences in foods consumed where morning sickness does not occur, including more maize, fats, and vegetables.

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  4. Morning sickness will be negatively associated with the frequency of fat consumption (72).Minturn, Leigh - The influence of diet on morning sickness: a cross-cultural study, 1984 - 2 Variables

    This article proposes that differences in diet may account for the presence or absence of morning sickness in a society. Data suggest that morning sickness is not a universal symptom of pregnancy, and there are significant differences in foods consumed where morning sickness does not occur, including more maize, fats, and vegetables.

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  5. Morning sickness will be negatively associated with eating maize as a staple food (72).Minturn, Leigh - The influence of diet on morning sickness: a cross-cultural study, 1984 - 2 Variables

    This article proposes that differences in diet may account for the presence or absence of morning sickness in a society. Data suggest that morning sickness is not a universal symptom of pregnancy, and there are significant differences in foods consumed where morning sickness does not occur, including more maize, fats, and vegetables.

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  6. People in societies without morning sickness will consume green vegetables and fat more frequently in than societies where morning sickness is present (74).Minturn, Leigh - The influence of diet on morning sickness: a cross-cultural study, 1984 - 0 Variables

    This article proposes that differences in diet may account for the presence or absence of morning sickness in a society. Data suggest that morning sickness is not a universal symptom of pregnancy, and there are significant differences in foods consumed where morning sickness does not occur, including more maize, fats, and vegetables.

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  7. Infanticide occurs before the birth ceremony is performed (p. 72).Minturn, Leigh - Infanticide as a terminal abortion procedure, 1982 - 1 Variables

    This study investigates the conceptual frameworks involved in infanticide. Authors first examine data on infanticide and birth ceremonies, particularly the timing of these events and the infant and adult involved in each. Authors also examine reasons for performing infanticide, including illegitimacy, unwanted children, and excess children, finding them similar to reasons for performing abortion. Population control and implications for children's and women's status are also discussed.

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  8. Birth ceremonies are more common in societies that customarily practice infanticide than in societies that do not (p. 72-3).Minturn, Leigh - Infanticide as a terminal abortion procedure, 1982 - 2 Variables

    This study investigates the conceptual frameworks involved in infanticide. Authors first examine data on infanticide and birth ceremonies, particularly the timing of these events and the infant and adult involved in each. Authors also examine reasons for performing infanticide, including illegitimacy, unwanted children, and excess children, finding them similar to reasons for performing abortion. Population control and implications for children's and women's status are also discussed.

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  9. ". . . mothers who contribute to the family income, and who therefore have extensive duties other than child care, are less permissive about insubordination from their children than are mothers who are less burdened with chores that are unrelated to their children" (172)Minturn, Leigh - The antecedents of child training: a cross-cultural test of some hypotheses, 1964 - 3 Variables

    This book chapter examines relationships between the child-training behavior of mothers and the responsibilities of both mothers and others. Child-training behavior is also examined in relation to single and multiple family dwellings.

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  10. Societies in which morning sickness was not observed will be significantly more likely to have (i) only plants as a food staple, (ii) corn as a staple, and (iii) corn as the only staple than societies in which morning sickness was observed (129).Flaxman, Samuel M. - Morning sickness: a mechanism for protecting mother and embryo, 2000 - 4 Variables

    Pregnancy sickness is characterized by nausea, vomiting, and food aversions during pregnancy, particularly during the first trimester. Previous work has asserted an adaptationist explanation for this phenomenon: pregnancy sickness protects the embryo from the toxic compounds found in many foods via expulsion (i.e., vomiting) of potentially dangerous foods and by encouraging aversions to foods likely to harbor toxins or pathogens. The authors reexamine 27 small-scale societies previously investigated by Minturn and Weiher (1984) for evidence of pregnancy sickness and food aversions in light of the fetal protection hypotheses.

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