Found 3174 Hypotheses across 318 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. "In general, our hypothesis that mothers spend less time caring for their offspring when they have other people to help is confirmed . . ." (171)Minturn, Leigh - The antecedents of child training: a cross-cultural test of some hypotheses, 1964 - 2 Variables

    This book chapter examines relationships between the child-training behavior of mothers and the responsibilities of both mothers and others. Child-training behavior is also examined in relation to single and multiple family dwellings.

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  2. Societies desiring children more will tend to have severe punishment for abortion (282, 295).Textor, Robert B. - A Cross-Cultural Summary: Pregnancy, 1967 - 2 Variables

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural findings on pregnancy and childbirth pertaining to cultural, environmental, psychological, and social phenomena.

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  3. ". . . mothers who contribute to the family income, and who therefore have extensive duties other than child care, are less permissive about insubordination from their children than are mothers who are less burdened with chores that are unrelated to their children" (172)Minturn, Leigh - The antecedents of child training: a cross-cultural test of some hypotheses, 1964 - 3 Variables

    This book chapter examines relationships between the child-training behavior of mothers and the responsibilities of both mothers and others. Child-training behavior is also examined in relation to single and multiple family dwellings.

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  4. Controlling for mode of subsistence and male contribution, father-infant proximity (proxy for direct infant care) is negatively correlated with polygyny (p. 52).Marlowe, Frank W. - Paternal investment and the human mating system, 2000 - 2 Variables

    This article explores the interrelated roles of male parental investment (males' infant/child care and resource provisioning) and male-male competition (variation in male status) on the degree of monogamy or polygyny in a society. Marlowe argues that Degree of parental investment affects females' interest in resource-shopping versus gene-shopping. Also discussed is the idea that male-male competition affects males' inclination toward harem-defense or coercive polygyny. Particular attention is paid to variation in parental investment and male stratification across subsistence types.

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  5. ". . . we hypothesized that mothers are more unstable [in mood] when they must spend large amounts of time caring for children" (171-172)Minturn, Leigh - The antecedents of child training: a cross-cultural test of some hypotheses, 1964 - 3 Variables

    This book chapter examines relationships between the child-training behavior of mothers and the responsibilities of both mothers and others. Child-training behavior is also examined in relation to single and multiple family dwellings.

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  6. Gender differences in time allocated to food production and play in children/adolescents reflect the proportion of time that adult men and women contribute to food production.Lew-Levy, Sheina - Socioecology shapes child and adolescent time allocation in twelve hunter-ga..., 2022 - 5 Variables

    This paper seeks to understand the roles played by children and adolescents in hunter-gatherer societies in relation to their social and ecological context. The authors set out to investigate how environmental factors, ecological risk, and the energetic contributions of adult men and women to food production may have influenced children/adolescent allocation of time to child care, domestic work, food production, and play. In order to carry out this study, the authors logged the behaviors of 690 children and adolescents from twelve hunter-gatherer and mixed-subsistence societies (Agta, Aka, Baka, BaYaka, Dukha, Hadza, Matsi-genka, Maya, Mayangna, Mikea, Pume, and Tsimane), totaling 85,597 unique observations. The study found that harsh environmental factors were not associated with child/adolescent time allocation, but that local ecological risk such as dangerous animals and lack of water availability predicted decreased time allocation to child care and domestic work, and that increased adult female participation in food production was associated with less time invested in child care among boys. It also found that all gendered differences in time allocation among children were stronger when men made greater contributions to food production than women. The authors interpret these results to signify that parents may play a role in preparing their children for environmental and ecological difficulty in order to help them develop skills that will help them become useful community members as adults.

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  7. Father involvement will be negatively associated with adulthood gender inequality and, more strongly, childhood gender inequality (68).Baunach, Dawn Michelle - Gender inequality in childhood: toward a life course perspective, 2001 - 3 Variables

    This article builds upon gender inequality theory to examine childhood gender inequality in preindustrial societies. Multivariate and cluster analysis are used.

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  8. Female contribution to subsistence will be positively associated with polygyny (p. 702).Lee, Gary R. - Marital structure and economic systems, 1979 - 2 Variables

    This article tests a broad hypothesis that marital structure is associated with economic type. Results indicate that where women's potential contribution to subsistence is high (as in gathering and agricultural societies), women's contribution is positively associated with polygyny. By contrast, in fishing, hunting, and herding societies, female contribution to subsistence is generally minimal and has a negative association with polygyny.

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  9. Child training with indulgence followed by compliance is positively associated with group initiation using masks and/or disciplinary whipping (5).Granzberg, Gary - The psychological integration of culture: a cross-cultural study of Hopi typ..., 1973 - 2 Variables

    This article explores the hypothesis that certain initiation and child-rearing patterns are integrated by virtue of the fact that the child rearing creates a specific kind of problem personality that the initiation counteracts. Early indulgence followed by compliance child training is explored in the Hopi culture, and similar patterns are examined in a sample of societies.

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  10. ". . . mothers who have extensive duties besides those of child training will require children to be more responsible than mothers who can devote themselves more exclusively to their children" (173-174)Minturn, Leigh - The antecedents of child training: a cross-cultural test of some hypotheses, 1964 - 2 Variables

    This book chapter examines relationships between the child-training behavior of mothers and the responsibilities of both mothers and others. Child-training behavior is also examined in relation to single and multiple family dwellings.

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