Found 1974 Hypotheses across 198 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. Lexical numbers (LNs) are a necessary predictor for grammatical number (GN)Overmann, Karenleigh A. - Numerosity structures the expression of quantity in lexical numbers and gram..., 2015 - 2 Variables

    In order to examine the development of lexical numbers (LN), the linguistic rules which allow for expression of high quantities and complex numerical operations, Overmann examines LN's association with grammatical number (GN), an expression of quantity based on the distinction between singular and multiple entities. LN and GN generally occur together, but LN is also found in a significant number of societies lacking GN, indicating that the two are both independent and related. A subsequent analysis of geographic distribution of LNs and GN indicates that LN may emerge prior to GN as a result of the interaction of numerosity (the ability to perceive different quantities) with tactile engagement with material structures (e.g. tools, the hand) which may subsequently lead to the development of GN. Overmann examines the theoretical implications of and explanations for these findings, and discusses how the present study contributes to the knowledge of linguistic frameworks.

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  2. Lexical numbers (LNs) are sufficient for grammatical number (GN)Overmann, Karenleigh A. - Numerosity structures the expression of quantity in lexical numbers and gram..., 2015 - 2 Variables

    In order to examine the development of lexical numbers (LN), the linguistic rules which allow for expression of high quantities and complex numerical operations, Overmann examines LN's association with grammatical number (GN), an expression of quantity based on the distinction between singular and multiple entities. LN and GN generally occur together, but LN is also found in a significant number of societies lacking GN, indicating that the two are both independent and related. A subsequent analysis of geographic distribution of LNs and GN indicates that LN may emerge prior to GN as a result of the interaction of numerosity (the ability to perceive different quantities) with tactile engagement with material structures (e.g. tools, the hand) which may subsequently lead to the development of GN. Overmann examines the theoretical implications of and explanations for these findings, and discusses how the present study contributes to the knowledge of linguistic frameworks.

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  3. Grammatical number (GN) is sufficient for lexical numbers (LNs)Overmann, Karenleigh A. - Numerosity structures the expression of quantity in lexical numbers and gram..., 2015 - 2 Variables

    In order to examine the development of lexical numbers (LN), the linguistic rules which allow for expression of high quantities and complex numerical operations, Overmann examines LN's association with grammatical number (GN), an expression of quantity based on the distinction between singular and multiple entities. LN and GN generally occur together, but LN is also found in a significant number of societies lacking GN, indicating that the two are both independent and related. A subsequent analysis of geographic distribution of LNs and GN indicates that LN may emerge prior to GN as a result of the interaction of numerosity (the ability to perceive different quantities) with tactile engagement with material structures (e.g. tools, the hand) which may subsequently lead to the development of GN. Overmann examines the theoretical implications of and explanations for these findings, and discusses how the present study contributes to the knowledge of linguistic frameworks.

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  4. Material complexity will be positively associated with later-stage number terms (23).Overmann, Karenleigh A. - Material scaffolds in numbers and time, 2013 - 2 Variables

    This paper examines the relationship between the complexity of a society's material culture and its development of cognitive technologies for numeration and timekeeping. The researcher claims that the resulting positive correlation between these variables as support for a theory of material culture as 'scaffolding' for number concepts, providing tangible, shareable, manipulable forms for abstract numerical constructions.

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  5. There will be a relationship between latitude and counting systems (343).Divale, William Tulio - Climatic instability, food storage, and the development of numerical countin..., 1999 - 2 Variables

    A model for the development of counting systems is tested. The hypothesis presented predicts that unpredictable climate conditions result in inconsistent food supply which leads to the need for food storage and, thus, a system to account for the stored food. Results strongly support this hypothesis.

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  6. Societies that store significant amounts of food will have more elaborate counting systems (343).Divale, William Tulio - Climatic instability, food storage, and the development of numerical countin..., 1999 - 2 Variables

    A model for the development of counting systems is tested. The hypothesis presented predicts that unpredictable climate conditions result in inconsistent food supply which leads to the need for food storage and, thus, a system to account for the stored food. Results strongly support this hypothesis.

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  7. Findings: Factor A, "Apollonianism or Norm-Sending", has high positive loadings (oblimax rotation) for: elaboration of ceremony and ritual, organized priesthood, authority vested in judges, power vested in chief, government by restricted council, and attractiveness of future life. Highest negative loadings are for marriage by capture and domesticated animals other than herded.Gouldner, Alvin W. - Notes on technology and the moral order, 1962 - 8 Variables

    Using empirical data and statistical methodology, Gouldner and Peterson aim to identify fundamental dimensions across societies, examine the relationships among these dimensions, and evaluate their importance. Data analysis is largely based on factor analysis, and the authors discuss how statistical methods fit into functional social theory.

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  8. Findings: Factor T, "Level of Technology", with its stress on pottery and grain for food is suggestive of neolithic technology. The two heaviest positive loadings (oblimax rotation) were noted above. Other heavy positive loadings are: mining and smelting, prevalence of war, basketry, money, weaving, herding, agriculture, domesticated animals other than herded. Highest negative loadings are: warm climate, legendary heroes, fishing, and patrilocal residence (25)Gouldner, Alvin W. - Notes on technology and the moral order, 1962 - 14 Variables

    Using empirical data and statistical methodology, Gouldner and Peterson aim to identify fundamental dimensions across societies, examine the relationships among these dimensions, and evaluate their importance. Data analysis is largely based on factor analysis, and the authors discuss how statistical methods fit into functional social theory.

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  9. Complexity of material culture will be negatively associated with use of relational estimations of time (30).Overmann, Karenleigh A. - Material scaffolds in numbers and time, 2013 - 8 Variables

    This paper examines the relationship between the complexity of a society's material culture and its development of cognitive technologies for numeration and timekeeping. The researcher claims that the resulting positive correlation between these variables as support for a theory of material culture as 'scaffolding' for number concepts, providing tangible, shareable, manipulable forms for abstract numerical constructions.

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  10. “[P]opulations in colder or more unstable climates are more likely to store food and thus to count to higher numbers” (71).McCall, Lauren W. - Cultural adaptations after progressionism, 2009 - 2 Variables

    This article challenges ideas of cultural progressionism through an analysis of counting systems. Cultural adaptation in both biotic and abiotic environments is examined, and results suggest that culture adapts to both the human-made environment and the physical environment. The author asserts that “interpreting divergent and convergent behaviors as due to differences and similarities of local environments” is superior to a progressionist approach to cultural change (62).

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