Found 4613 Hypotheses across 462 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. There are ethnographic accounts of human societies that specify the special handling/treatment/disposition of the placenta following parturition other than placentophagy.Young, Sharon M. - In Search of Human Placentophagy: A Cross-Cultural Survey of Human Placenta ..., 2010 - 1 Variables

    The present research examines the consumption, treatment, and disposal of the human placenta in a sample of 179 societies. The findings reveal differences between placental mammals and humans as maternal placentophagy, the consumption of the placenta, is rare. Treatment and disposal of the placenta is variable but ubiquitous cross-culturally.

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  2. There are ethnographic accounts of human societies that are/were known to regularly practice maternal placentophagy.Young, Sharon M. - In Search of Human Placentophagy: A Cross-Cultural Survey of Human Placenta ..., 2010 - 1 Variables

    The present research examines the consumption, treatment, and disposal of the human placenta in a sample of 179 societies. The findings reveal differences between placental mammals and humans as maternal placentophagy, the consumption of the placenta, is rare. Treatment and disposal of the placenta is variable but ubiquitous cross-culturally.

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  3. There are ethnographic accounts of human societies that are/were known to regularly practice placentophagy by someone other than the mother.Young, Sharon M. - In Search of Human Placentophagy: A Cross-Cultural Survey of Human Placenta ..., 2010 - 1 Variables

    The present research examines the consumption, treatment, and disposal of the human placenta in a sample of 179 societies. The findings reveal differences between placental mammals and humans as maternal placentophagy, the consumption of the placenta, is rare. Treatment and disposal of the placenta is variable but ubiquitous cross-culturally.

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  4. Positive treatment of pets will be present across cultures.Gray, Peter B. - Human–Pet Dynamics in Cross-Cultural Perspective, 2011 - 1 Variables

    Using a sample of 60 societies from eHRAF, this study explores the cross-cultural commonalities and differences in human-pet dynamics. The authors focus on understanding the range of functions of pets and the positive or negative treatment of pets. In addition, they test whether human investment in pets is a significant challenge of evolutionary theory. First, the results support that there are distinct functions of pets, challenging the common view of contemporary function of pets as emotional surrogates. Secondly, the data collected show an ambivalent treatment of pets across cultures, including small-scale societies. Finally, the research does not support the idea that human investment in pets sacrifices their reproductive success.

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  5. "Men bury the placenta, 'rest', or observe post partum taboos . . . [more frequently in cultures with low menstrual taboo scores than in cultures with high menstrual taboo scores]" (162)Montgomery, Rita E. - A cross-cultural study of menstruation, menstrual taboos and related social ..., 1974 - 2 Variables

    This article explores biological, psychological, and social explanations for menstrual taboos. Attention is paid to the role of men in rituals associated with reproduction--i.e. before, during and after childbirth, as well as during girls' puberty rites.

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  6. The function of pets will be cross-culturally different from the view of pets as playthings and emotional surrogates for children.Gray, Peter B. - Human–Pet Dynamics in Cross-Cultural Perspective, 2011 - 1 Variables

    Using a sample of 60 societies from eHRAF, this study explores the cross-cultural commonalities and differences in human-pet dynamics. The authors focus on understanding the range of functions of pets and the positive or negative treatment of pets. In addition, they test whether human investment in pets is a significant challenge of evolutionary theory. First, the results support that there are distinct functions of pets, challenging the common view of contemporary function of pets as emotional surrogates. Secondly, the data collected show an ambivalent treatment of pets across cultures, including small-scale societies. Finally, the research does not support the idea that human investment in pets sacrifices their reproductive success.

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  7. Human investment in pets will sacrifice their reproductive success on behalf of pets.Gray, Peter B. - Human–Pet Dynamics in Cross-Cultural Perspective, 2011 - 1 Variables

    Using a sample of 60 societies from eHRAF, this study explores the cross-cultural commonalities and differences in human-pet dynamics. The authors focus on understanding the range of functions of pets and the positive or negative treatment of pets. In addition, they test whether human investment in pets is a significant challenge of evolutionary theory. First, the results support that there are distinct functions of pets, challenging the common view of contemporary function of pets as emotional surrogates. Secondly, the data collected show an ambivalent treatment of pets across cultures, including small-scale societies. Finally, the research does not support the idea that human investment in pets sacrifices their reproductive success.

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  8. Change in kinship terminologies will be universally predicted by residence patterns.Passmore, Sam - No universals in the cultural evolution of kinship terminology, 2020 - 2 Variables

    Using phylogenetic comparative methods, the study explores the evolution of kinship terminologies within 176 societies in Austronesian, Bantu, and Uto-Aztecan language families. The authors consider 18 theories in the anthropological record that suggests that change in kinship terminologies is predicted by some social structures: marriage, residence, and descent. Only 19 of the 29 statistical hypotheses are supported, while none of the theories are supported in all three language families. This statistical irregularity means that the results are lineage-specific, instead of showing a universal driver of change in kinship terminology types.

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  9. Change in kinship terminologies will be universally predicted by common ancestry.Passmore, Sam - No universals in the cultural evolution of kinship terminology, 2020 - 2 Variables

    Using phylogenetic comparative methods, the study explores the evolution of kinship terminologies within 176 societies in Austronesian, Bantu, and Uto-Aztecan language families. The authors consider 18 theories in the anthropological record that suggests that change in kinship terminologies is predicted by some social structures: marriage, residence, and descent. Only 19 of the 29 statistical hypotheses are supported, while none of the theories are supported in all three language families. This statistical irregularity means that the results are lineage-specific, instead of showing a universal driver of change in kinship terminology types.

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  10. Change in kinship terminologies will be universally predicted by mode of marriage.Passmore, Sam - No universals in the cultural evolution of kinship terminology, 2020 - 2 Variables

    Using phylogenetic comparative methods, the study explores the evolution of kinship terminologies within 176 societies in Austronesian, Bantu, and Uto-Aztecan language families. The authors consider 18 theories in the anthropological record that suggests that change in kinship terminologies is predicted by some social structures: marriage, residence, and descent. Only 19 of the 29 statistical hypotheses are supported, while none of the theories are supported in all three language families. This statistical irregularity means that the results are lineage-specific, instead of showing a universal driver of change in kinship terminology types.

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