Found 1706 Hypotheses across 171 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. The "exclusivity gain" model (an N-G-K-I trajectory) will best predict the evolution of land tenure norms (314)Kushnick, Geoff - The sequential evolution of land tenure norms, 2014 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the authors utilize phylogenetic methods to reconstruct the evolution of land tenure norms among 97 Austronesian societies. They coded these norms for each society as none (N), group (G), group-kin (K), and individual (I). After formulating various models of evolution through these various stages, they used Bayesian analysis to determine support for each. They conclude with remarks about this type of evolutionary phylogenetic research as a form of "virtual archeology."

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  2. The "unstable group" model (where all transitions are possible, except G can only emerge from N) will best predict the evolution of land tenure norms (314)Kushnick, Geoff - The sequential evolution of land tenure norms, 2014 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the authors utilize phylogenetic methods to reconstruct the evolution of land tenure norms among 97 Austronesian societies. They coded these norms for each society as none (N), group (G), group-kin (K), and individual (I). After formulating various models of evolution through these various stages, they used Bayesian analysis to determine support for each. They conclude with remarks about this type of evolutionary phylogenetic research as a form of "virtual archeology."

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  3. The "gain from none" model (where all norms are can emerge from N, but cannot regress) will best predict the evolution of land tenure norms (314)Kushnick, Geoff - The sequential evolution of land tenure norms, 2014 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the authors utilize phylogenetic methods to reconstruct the evolution of land tenure norms among 97 Austronesian societies. They coded these norms for each society as none (N), group (G), group-kin (K), and individual (I). After formulating various models of evolution through these various stages, they used Bayesian analysis to determine support for each. They conclude with remarks about this type of evolutionary phylogenetic research as a form of "virtual archeology."

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  4. The "no loss" model (where all transitions to are possible except back to N) will best predict the evolution of land tenure norms (314)Kushnick, Geoff - The sequential evolution of land tenure norms, 2014 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the authors utilize phylogenetic methods to reconstruct the evolution of land tenure norms among 97 Austronesian societies. They coded these norms for each society as none (N), group (G), group-kin (K), and individual (I). After formulating various models of evolution through these various stages, they used Bayesian analysis to determine support for each. They conclude with remarks about this type of evolutionary phylogenetic research as a form of "virtual archeology."

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  5. The "full" model (where all four land tenure norms are transitioned to and from freely) will best predict the evolution of land tenure norms (314)Kushnick, Geoff - The sequential evolution of land tenure norms, 2014 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the authors utilize phylogenetic methods to reconstruct the evolution of land tenure norms among 97 Austronesian societies. They coded these norms for each society as none (N), group (G), group-kin (K), and individual (I). After formulating various models of evolution through these various stages, they used Bayesian analysis to determine support for each. They conclude with remarks about this type of evolutionary phylogenetic research as a form of "virtual archeology."

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  6. The "kin-group" model (where all transitions are allowed, expect from K) will best predict the evolution of land tenure norms (314)Kushnick, Geoff - The sequential evolution of land tenure norms, 2014 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the authors utilize phylogenetic methods to reconstruct the evolution of land tenure norms among 97 Austronesian societies. They coded these norms for each society as none (N), group (G), group-kin (K), and individual (I). After formulating various models of evolution through these various stages, they used Bayesian analysis to determine support for each. They conclude with remarks about this type of evolutionary phylogenetic research as a form of "virtual archeology."

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  7. The "loss for change model" (where there are free transitions to and from all forms of tenure norms with the stipulation that they pass through N) will best predict the evolution of land tenure norms (314)Kushnick, Geoff - The sequential evolution of land tenure norms, 2014 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the authors utilize phylogenetic methods to reconstruct the evolution of land tenure norms among 97 Austronesian societies. They coded these norms for each society as none (N), group (G), group-kin (K), and individual (I). After formulating various models of evolution through these various stages, they used Bayesian analysis to determine support for each. They conclude with remarks about this type of evolutionary phylogenetic research as a form of "virtual archeology."

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  8. The "corporate model" (where all transitions are possible, except once K or I arise there can only be changes between them) will best predict the evolution of land tenure norms (314)Kushnick, Geoff - The sequential evolution of land tenure norms, 2014 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the authors utilize phylogenetic methods to reconstruct the evolution of land tenure norms among 97 Austronesian societies. They coded these norms for each society as none (N), group (G), group-kin (K), and individual (I). After formulating various models of evolution through these various stages, they used Bayesian analysis to determine support for each. They conclude with remarks about this type of evolutionary phylogenetic research as a form of "virtual archeology."

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  9. Phylogenetic modeling indicates strong support for an evolution of land tenure norms in N-I-G-K order (see note).Kushnik, Geoff - The sequential evolution of land tenure norms, 2014 - 1 Variables

    The researchers use phylogenetic methods to map out the evolutionary trajectories of land tenure norms across 97 Austronesian societies. The analysis suggests the relevance of vertical transmission in patterning land tenure norms, rather than horizontal transmission. It also strongly supports a model along a N(none)-I(individual)-G(group)-K(kin) pathway.

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  10. Land ownership norms will have both vertically and horizontally cultural transmission.Haynie, Hannah J. - The biogeography and evolution of land ownership, 2023 - 3 Variables

    This study asks the following research questions: What are the dynamics of land ownership norms over time? Do these changes follow predetermined trajectories? The authors utilize biogeographical and evolutionary analyses to explore temporal and spatial patterns in land ownership norms within a sample of 73 Bantu societies. For the first component of the research, they test three prominent hypotheses regarding evolutionary trajectories: rectilinear, unilinear, and shift without restriction. For the second component, they use a multi-model inference approach to evaluate three hypotheses regarding the possible spatial patterns of land ownership. The results show evidence for the unilinear trajectory in type, but not with a consistent decrease in group ownership in size. Land ownership is more likely in areas with neighboring landowners and predictable resource productivity, while subsistence type is not significantly correlated with type of land ownership.

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