Found 2365 Hypotheses across 237 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. "Pressures toward achievement and self-reliance would be associated with frequent drunkenness" (38)Bacon, Margaret K. - A cross-cultural study of drinking: ii. relations to other features of culture, 1965 - 8 Variables

    This study explores cultural variables associated with frequency of drunkenness and ceremonial drinking. Particular attention was paid to childhood socialization variables, as well as politcal and social organization. Results show a low correlation between frequency of drunkenness and frequency of ceremonial drinking, and various other variables are associated with each.

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  2. "Pressures toward achievement and self reliance are . . . [negatively related] with ceremonial drinking" (41)Bacon, Margaret K. - A cross-cultural study of drinking: ii. relations to other features of culture, 1965 - 8 Variables

    This study explores cultural variables associated with frequency of drunkenness and ceremonial drinking. Particular attention was paid to childhood socialization variables, as well as politcal and social organization. Results show a low correlation between frequency of drunkenness and frequency of ceremonial drinking, and various other variables are associated with each.

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  3. "The presence of the [male initiation] rites was strongly related to low drunkenness while their absence tended to go with high drunkenness" (57)Davis, William N. - A cross-cultural study of drunkenness, 1964 - 2 Variables

    This study examines the influence of the "child-adult" conflict on the frequency of drunkenness in a culture. In particular, the author examines the socio-psychological factors that can induce a child-adult conflict, claiming that this conflict may be more common when mothers are the primary dispensers of rewards.

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  4. "Sleeping arrangements were not significantly related to drunkenness. But mother-child households . . . tended to go with a low frequency of drunkenness" (55)Davis, William N. - A cross-cultural study of drunkenness, 1964 - 2 Variables

    This study examines the influence of the "child-adult" conflict on the frequency of drunkenness in a culture. In particular, the author examines the socio-psychological factors that can induce a child-adult conflict, claiming that this conflict may be more common when mothers are the primary dispensers of rewards.

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  5. "Bilateral and cognatic kin . . . are highly indulgent to young children, reject an adult's dependency needs, and furthermore greatly emphasize adult achievement. These conditions seem ideal for the development of a 'child-adult' conflict, and the latter should be reflected, as indeed it is, in a high frequency of drunkenness" (50-51)Davis, William N. - A cross-cultural study of drunkenness, 1964 - 5 Variables

    This study examines the influence of the "child-adult" conflict on the frequency of drunkenness in a culture. In particular, the author examines the socio-psychological factors that can induce a child-adult conflict, claiming that this conflict may be more common when mothers are the primary dispensers of rewards.

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  6. "Achievement is stressed in the same kin groups [bilateral and cognatic] that tend to gratify strongly needs for dependency, passivity, and indulgence" (49)Davis, William N. - A cross-cultural study of drunkenness, 1964 - 3 Variables

    This study examines the influence of the "child-adult" conflict on the frequency of drunkenness in a culture. In particular, the author examines the socio-psychological factors that can induce a child-adult conflict, claiming that this conflict may be more common when mothers are the primary dispensers of rewards.

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  7. "As shown, presence of adolescent segregation tended to go with a low frequency of drunkenness" (58)Davis, William N. - A cross-cultural study of drunkenness, 1964 - 2 Variables

    This study examines the influence of the "child-adult" conflict on the frequency of drunkenness in a culture. In particular, the author examines the socio-psychological factors that can induce a child-adult conflict, claiming that this conflict may be more common when mothers are the primary dispensers of rewards.

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  8. "[T]he relative importance of boys' [puberty] rites tended to go more often with low drunkenness while girls' rites usually went with high drunkenness" (60)Davis, William N. - A cross-cultural study of drunkenness, 1964 - 2 Variables

    This study examines the influence of the "child-adult" conflict on the frequency of drunkenness in a culture. In particular, the author examines the socio-psychological factors that can induce a child-adult conflict, claiming that this conflict may be more common when mothers are the primary dispensers of rewards.

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  9. ". . . bride price tended to go with low drunkenness, and bride service was more often associated with high drunkenness" (61)Davis, William N. - A cross-cultural study of drunkenness, 1964 - 2 Variables

    This study examines the influence of the "child-adult" conflict on the frequency of drunkenness in a culture. In particular, the author examines the socio-psychological factors that can induce a child-adult conflict, claiming that this conflict may be more common when mothers are the primary dispensers of rewards.

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  10. "Indulgence of dependence is negatively related to frequency of [drunkenness]" (35)Bacon, Margaret K. - A cross-cultural study of drinking: ii. relations to other features of culture, 1965 - 5 Variables

    This study explores cultural variables associated with frequency of drunkenness and ceremonial drinking. Particular attention was paid to childhood socialization variables, as well as politcal and social organization. Results show a low correlation between frequency of drunkenness and frequency of ceremonial drinking, and various other variables are associated with each.

    Related HypothesesCite