Found 4370 Hypotheses across 437 Pages (0.005 seconds)
  1. Using clothing for modesty purposes represents one possible origin of clothing.Buckner, William - Disguises and the Origins of Clothing, 2021 - 1 Variables

    In this study, the author explores different pathways to the emergence of clothing outside of thermoregulation, with a focus on the use of clothing for disguise or concealment. He finds disguises in 8 out of 10 sampled societies, proposing that attempts at disguise or concealment is one possible pathway to the cultural evolution of clothing. He also finds clothing used for modesty and body armor purposes.

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  2. Body armor represents one possible origin of clothing.Buckner, William - Disguises and the Origins of Clothing, 2021 - 1 Variables

    In this study, the author explores different pathways to the emergence of clothing outside of thermoregulation, with a focus on the use of clothing for disguise or concealment. He finds disguises in 8 out of 10 sampled societies, proposing that attempts at disguise or concealment is one possible pathway to the cultural evolution of clothing. He also finds clothing used for modesty and body armor purposes.

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  3. "Penalties for adultery are related in the expected direction for presence of plural marriage, frequency of adoption, and legitimate sex outside of marriage. But . . . such small numbers of cases [do not] approach . . . statistical significance" (123-124)Rosenblatt, Paul C. - Divorce for childlessness and the regulation of adultery, 1972 - 4 Variables

    This study attempts to expand on the list of common customs employed to cope with childlessness in a marriage. Authors specifically examine the relationship between the presence of customs that help cope with childlessness and the severity of punishment for adultery. Results indicate a significant relationship between these two variables.

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  4. "Residence will be matrilocal when females predominate in subsistence (100).Divale, William Tulio - An explanation for matrilocal residence, 1975 - 2 Variables

    This study explores possible causes of matrilocal residence. Previous hypotheses are unsupported. Results show a significant relationship between matrilocality and recent migration.

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  5. "Penalties for adultery [are] related [negatively] to . . . trial marriage" (123)Rosenblatt, Paul C. - Divorce for childlessness and the regulation of adultery, 1972 - 2 Variables

    This study attempts to expand on the list of common customs employed to cope with childlessness in a marriage. Authors specifically examine the relationship between the presence of customs that help cope with childlessness and the severity of punishment for adultery. Results indicate a significant relationship between these two variables.

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  6. Certain clothing practices will be associated with the 10 degree isotherm.Whiting, John W.M. - Winter temperature as a constraint to the migration of preindustrial peoples, 1982 - 2 Variables

    Using a sample of 313 societies classified within 24 language phyla, authors put forward a statistical model based on climate data [specifically focused on the 10°C (50°F) winter temperature isotherm] to explain why dispersion of preindustrial language phyla is remarkably homogeneous even despite heterogeneous geographical dispersion of sampled preindustrial cultural groups. They suggest that temperature has been a barrier to migration.

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  7. "the extensiveness of menstrual taboos observed in a primitive society is determined to a significant extent by the average intensity of castration anxiety felt by men [as measured by frequency of genital injury and severing in folktales]" (69,89)Stephens, William N. - A cross cultural study of menstrual taboos, 1967 - 3 Variables

    This study tests the relationship between menstrual taboos and castration anxiety. The author posits that the extensiveness of menstrual taboos is determined by the average castration anxiety. Using various measures of castration anxiety, the author finds significant support for this hypothesis.

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  8. "Extensiveness of menstrual taboo observed in a primitive society is determined to a significant extent by the average intensity of castration anxiety felt by men [as measured by child rearing practices]"Stephens, William N. - A cross cultural study of menstrual taboos, 1967 - 6 Variables

    This study tests the relationship between menstrual taboos and castration anxiety. The author posits that the extensiveness of menstrual taboos is determined by the average castration anxiety. Using various measures of castration anxiety, the author finds significant support for this hypothesis.

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  9. Agricultural societies will have higher paternal certainty than hunter-gatherer societies (230).Gaulin, Steven J.C. - Sexual dimorphism in the human post-reproductive life-span: possible causes, 1980 - 2 Variables

    This study tests possible explanations for sexual dimorphism in human post-reproductive life-spans. The author focuses on explanations involving male paternal investment and finds that men in agricultural societies are more likely to invest in their offspring than men in hunter-gatherer societies.

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  10. Animal husbandry and intensive agriculture are positively associated with favoritism toward the male (18)Hope, Christine A. - A cross-cultural study of gender status, 1980 - 3 Variables

    This article introduces an index containing information that is accessible, applicable to many societies, and pertinent to male/female differences associated with various aspects of life. While hypotheses are not formally presented, the names of the cultures in the index are specified as is an example of the type of status analyses that the index can be used for.

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