Found 3657 Hypotheses across 366 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. Type of subsistence will predict the degree to which entomophagy is practiced.Cruz y Celis Peniche, Patricio - Drivers of insect consumption across human populations, 2022 - 2 Variables

    This study seeks to shed light on the practice of entomophagy (insect consumption) across human population and seeks to explain the variability in its practice. The author explore potential ecological predictors for insect consumption (climate, subsistence practices, other available food resources, dietary needs) as well as cultural predictors (social transmission, cultural norms, evolution, and shift). Ultimately, the author concludes that entomophagy may be a useful medium through which to examine the interaction between social learning, subsistence strategies, and modernization.

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  2. Matrilocality will be associated with positioning on a cultural frontierJones, Doug - The Matrilocal Tribe: An Organization of Demic Expansion, 2011 - 2 Variables

    In this article, the author argues that matrilocality is a form of social organization that is conducive to expansion in tribal societies with smaller populations. Because this organization increases internal solidarity and success in external warfare, the theory suggests that it is best suited for expansion on cultural frontiers by groups with small populations. The author supports this theory with empirical tests on 33 societies and case studies of Bantu and Austronesian expansion.

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  3. As time since migration increases, small-scale societies will move through the following sequence of residence and descent configurations: matrilocal and patrilineal to matrilocal and bilateral to matrilocal and matrilineal to avunculocal and matrilineal to patrilocal and bilateral or patrilineal.Jones, Doug - The Matrilocal Tribe: An Organization of Demic Expansion, 2011 - 2 Variables

    In this article, the author argues that matrilocality is a form of social organization that is conducive to expansion in tribal societies with smaller populations. Because this organization increases internal solidarity and success in external warfare, the theory suggests that it is best suited for expansion on cultural frontiers by groups with small populations. The author supports this theory with empirical tests on 33 societies and case studies of Bantu and Austronesian expansion.

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  4. Certain characteristics of societies will be significantly correlated in the same direction in both of Murdock's data sets.Rudmin, Floyd Webster - Cross-Cultural Correlates of the Ownership of Private Property: Two Samples ..., 1995 - 55 Variables

    The present study aims to evaluate correlations of private property from two of Murdock's datasets, one of 147 societies (1981) and the other of 312 societies (1967). Altogether the author tested 146 variables coded by Murdock against variables regarding the ownership of land and of movables drawn from Murdock (1967), Simmons (1937), and Swanson (1960). In total, there were 51 statistically significant correlations between private property ownership and other variables. Additionally, the author summarizes the results from this article and the two that preceded it stating that throughout all of the correlations he ran, the practice of agriculture, the use of cereal grains, and the presence of castes and classes were the only variables that predicted private property in all of the datasets that were utilized.

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  5. Subsistence mode will be correlated with the presence of inequality.Wilson, Kurt M. - The Marginal Utility of Inequality: A Global Examination Across Ethnographic..., 2020 - 2 Variables

    In this study, the authors draw from intensity theory and combine previous research from the fields of behavioral ecology, economics, and social evolution to analyze drivers in the emergence and persistence of inequality across the world. They propose that environmental heterogeneity and circumscription (the difficulty of moving and establishing oneself in a new environment relative to remaining in the current one) play a significant role in the stratification of societies. Their results indicate that situations arise from various environmental conditions and levels of circumscription that may result in an individual giving up autonomy for material gain, thus favoring inequality.

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  6. Among European men, greater height will be negatively associated with support for government redistribution of wealthRichardson, Thomas - Height is associated with more self-serving beliefs about wealth redistribution, 2020 - 2 Variables

    This article is primarily concerned with formidability theory. This theory suggests that physical strength among men affects their views on social issues because evolutionary physically stronger men would have benefitted from more unequal power arrangements. Thus, the author seeks to investigate an association between height and views on wealth redistribution among European men. Through modeling, such a relationship was found and the author concludes that there is support for this theory.

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  7. After accounting for dispersal constraints, mammal diversity will predict farming propensity in early twentieth century traditional societiesVilela, Bruno - Cultural transmission and ecological opportunity jointly shaped global patte..., 2020 - 2 Variables

    In this article, the authors seek to investigate why some societies reject agriculture despite its many benefits. By modeling data regarding ecological fitness and cultural transmission, the authors found predictors for the degree to which a society relies on agriculture. The authors conclude that the degree of fitness a local environment had for early domesticates as well as the degree of contact with neighboring societies strongly predicts levels of dependence on agriculture.

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  8. After accounting for dispersal constraints, horizontal transmission will predict farming propensity in early twentieth century traditional societiesVilela, Bruno - Cultural transmission and ecological opportunity jointly shaped global patte..., 2020 - 2 Variables

    In this article, the authors seek to investigate why some societies reject agriculture despite its many benefits. By modeling data regarding ecological fitness and cultural transmission, the authors found predictors for the degree to which a society relies on agriculture. The authors conclude that the degree of fitness a local environment had for early domesticates as well as the degree of contact with neighboring societies strongly predicts levels of dependence on agriculture.

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  9. After accounting for dispersal constraints, the potential number of early domesticates will predict farming propensity in early twentieth century traditional societiesVilela, Bruno - Cultural transmission and ecological opportunity jointly shaped global patte..., 2020 - 2 Variables

    In this article, the authors seek to investigate why some societies reject agriculture despite its many benefits. By modeling data regarding ecological fitness and cultural transmission, the authors found predictors for the degree to which a society relies on agriculture. The authors conclude that the degree of fitness a local environment had for early domesticates as well as the degree of contact with neighboring societies strongly predicts levels of dependence on agriculture.

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  10. After accounting for dispersal constraints, vascular plant diversity will predict farming propensity in early twentieth century traditional societiesVilela, Bruno - Cultural transmission and ecological opportunity jointly shaped global patte..., 2020 - 2 Variables

    In this article, the authors seek to investigate why some societies reject agriculture despite its many benefits. By modeling data regarding ecological fitness and cultural transmission, the authors found predictors for the degree to which a society relies on agriculture. The authors conclude that the degree of fitness a local environment had for early domesticates as well as the degree of contact with neighboring societies strongly predicts levels of dependence on agriculture.

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