Found 2545 Hypotheses across 255 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. More traditional plough use is associated with lower contemporary female labor force participation.Fredriksson, Per G. - Irrigation and gender roles, 2023 - 2 Variables

    This paper suggests that ancestral irrigation is linked to lower levels of contemporary female labor force participation. The hypothesis is tested using cross-country data, as well as data from various surveys. The study finds evidence that the gender-based division of labor in pre-modern agriculture may be the mechanism behind this relationship, and that cultural transmission across generations, particularly through males, may play a role in perpetuating this pattern.

    Related HypothesesCite
  2. Greater ancestral irrigation potential is associated with higher contemporary male labor force participation.Fredriksson, Per G. - Irrigation and gender roles, 2023 - 2 Variables

    This paper suggests that ancestral irrigation is linked to lower levels of contemporary female labor force participation. The hypothesis is tested using cross-country data, as well as data from various surveys. The study finds evidence that the gender-based division of labor in pre-modern agriculture may be the mechanism behind this relationship, and that cultural transmission across generations, particularly through males, may play a role in perpetuating this pattern.

    Related HypothesesCite
  3. Ideas about gender roles in labor as derived from irrigation potential and plough use are transmitted across generations by men in Europe.Fredriksson, Per G. - Irrigation and gender roles, 2023 - 4 Variables

    This paper suggests that ancestral irrigation is linked to lower levels of contemporary female labor force participation. The hypothesis is tested using cross-country data, as well as data from various surveys. The study finds evidence that the gender-based division of labor in pre-modern agriculture may be the mechanism behind this relationship, and that cultural transmission across generations, particularly through males, may play a role in perpetuating this pattern.

    Related HypothesesCite
  4. Ideas about gender roles in labor as derived from irrigation potential and plough use are transmitted across generations in America.Fredriksson, Per G. - Irrigation and gender roles, 2023 - 4 Variables

    This paper suggests that ancestral irrigation is linked to lower levels of contemporary female labor force participation. The hypothesis is tested using cross-country data, as well as data from various surveys. The study finds evidence that the gender-based division of labor in pre-modern agriculture may be the mechanism behind this relationship, and that cultural transmission across generations, particularly through males, may play a role in perpetuating this pattern.

    Related HypothesesCite
  5. Greater ancestral irrigation potential is associated with lower contemporary female labor force participation.Fredriksson, Per G. - Irrigation and gender roles, 2023 - 2 Variables

    This paper suggests that ancestral irrigation is linked to lower levels of contemporary female labor force participation. The hypothesis is tested using cross-country data, as well as data from various surveys. The study finds evidence that the gender-based division of labor in pre-modern agriculture may be the mechanism behind this relationship, and that cultural transmission across generations, particularly through males, may play a role in perpetuating this pattern.

    Related HypothesesCite
  6. Historic plough use will be positively associated with fertility rate (499).Alesina, Alberto - Fertility and the plough, 2011 - 2 Variables

    The researchers examine Boserup's (1970) theory that variation in traditional agricultural practices shape gender roles by examining the relationship between historical plough use and contemporary fertility rates and preferential attitudes towards fertility. Contrary to expectation, tests show a negative relationship between plough use and both of these variables. The authors theorize that since children are less capable of performing the intensive labor required by plough agriculture compared to hoe agriculture, adoption of the plough deincentivized increased fertility and reduced its value among agriculturalists.

    Related HypothesesCite
  7. Diversity and complexity of toolkits used by farming and herding groups will be positively associated with risk of resource failure (2).Collard, Mark - Risk of resource failure and toolkit variation in small-scale farmers and he..., 2012 - 11 Variables

    Prior research by Oswalt (1973, 1976) and Torrence (1983, 2001) has suggested that risk of resource failure is a significant predictor of toolkit complexity and diversity among hunter-gatherers. In this paper, the same relationship is tested among small-scale herding and farming groups. However, no significant correlation is discovered between any measure of resource risk and any measure of toolkit complexity. The researchers suggest that this absence may be the result of greater reliance on non-technological diversification methods among farmers (i.e. spatial diversification, mixed farming, intercropping), or of other unaccounted-for sources of risk (i.e. intergroup raiding and warfare).

    Related HypothesesCite
  8. Historic plough use will be negatively associated with preference for fertility (502).Alesina, Alberto - Fertility and the plough, 2011 - 2 Variables

    The researchers examine Boserup's (1970) theory that variation in traditional agricultural practices shape gender roles by examining the relationship between historical plough use and contemporary fertility rates and preferential attitudes towards fertility. Contrary to expectation, tests show a negative relationship between plough use and both of these variables. The authors theorize that since children are less capable of performing the intensive labor required by plough agriculture compared to hoe agriculture, adoption of the plough deincentivized increased fertility and reduced its value among agriculturalists.

    Related HypothesesCite
  9. Traditional plough agriculture will be associated with lower overall female participation in agriculture (481).Alesina, Alberto - On the origins of gender roles: Women and the plough, 2013 - 7 Variables

    There is considerable variation both within and across societies in attitudes towards female employment outside of the household. In some societies, the dominant belief is that women should have equal opportunity to work outside the home, while in others women are strongly discouraged from working outside of the domestic sphere. Here the authors use pre-industrial ethnographic data and contemporary observations of gender inequality to test the hypothesis that cultural attitudes regarding the appropriateness of women working outside of the household are rooted in the ancestral adoption of plough cultivation. Contemporary measures of gender inequality assess variation across countries, ethnic groups, and individuals.

    Related HypothesesCite
  10. Traditional plough agriculture will be associated with lower female participation in land clearance (481).Alesina, Alberto - On the origins of gender roles: Women and the plough, 2013 - 7 Variables

    There is considerable variation both within and across societies in attitudes towards female employment outside of the household. In some societies, the dominant belief is that women should have equal opportunity to work outside the home, while in others women are strongly discouraged from working outside of the domestic sphere. Here the authors use pre-industrial ethnographic data and contemporary observations of gender inequality to test the hypothesis that cultural attitudes regarding the appropriateness of women working outside of the household are rooted in the ancestral adoption of plough cultivation. Contemporary measures of gender inequality assess variation across countries, ethnic groups, and individuals.

    Related HypothesesCite