Found 2530 Hypotheses across 253 Pages (0.005 seconds)
  1. "Societies that do not allow divorce for childlessness have less severe penalties for adultery" (122)Rosenblatt, Paul C. - Divorce for childlessness and the regulation of adultery, 1972 - 2 Variables

    This study attempts to expand on the list of common customs employed to cope with childlessness in a marriage. Authors specifically examine the relationship between the presence of customs that help cope with childlessness and the severity of punishment for adultery. Results indicate a significant relationship between these two variables.

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  2. "Penalties for adultery are related in the expected direction for presence of plural marriage, frequency of adoption, and legitimate sex outside of marriage. But . . . such small numbers of cases [do not] approach . . . statistical significance" (123-124)Rosenblatt, Paul C. - Divorce for childlessness and the regulation of adultery, 1972 - 4 Variables

    This study attempts to expand on the list of common customs employed to cope with childlessness in a marriage. Authors specifically examine the relationship between the presence of customs that help cope with childlessness and the severity of punishment for adultery. Results indicate a significant relationship between these two variables.

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  3. Magico-religious-ethnomedical solutions to childlessness will be more likely to be tried first than adoption or fosterage, divorce, or polygyny (224-5).Rosenblatt, Paul C. - A cross-cultural study of responses to childlessness, 1973 - 1 Variables

    This study investigates responses to childlessness in a cross-cultural sample. Solutions to childlessness appear universal, and magico-religious-ethnomedical solutions seem the most likely to be tried first. Empirical analysis also shows that women are blamed for childlessness more often than men, which the authors suggest could be due to women’s lower status.

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  4. Women will be more likely to be blamed for childlessness than men (227).Rosenblatt, Paul C. - A cross-cultural study of responses to childlessness, 1973 - 2 Variables

    This study investigates responses to childlessness in a cross-cultural sample. Solutions to childlessness appear universal, and magico-religious-ethnomedical solutions seem the most likely to be tried first. Empirical analysis also shows that women are blamed for childlessness more often than men, which the authors suggest could be due to women’s lower status.

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  5. "Importance of romantic love as a basis for marriage was rather strongly related to . . . later severity of [oral] socialization" (338)Rosenblatt, Paul C. - A cross cultural study of child rearing and romantic love, 1966 - 2 Variables

    This study examines the relationship between satisfaction of early oral and dependence needs and concern with affection in adulthood. Data showed significant support for an association between the satisfaction of early oral needs (but not the satisfaction of dependence needs) and concern for affection in adulthood.

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  6. "For the two measures of dependence frustration, the correlations with importance of romantic love as a basis for marriage are virtually zero" (338)Rosenblatt, Paul C. - A cross cultural study of child rearing and romantic love, 1966 - 3 Variables

    This study examines the relationship between satisfaction of early oral and dependence needs and concern with affection in adulthood. Data showed significant support for an association between the satisfaction of early oral needs (but not the satisfaction of dependence needs) and concern for affection in adulthood.

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  7. "It was predicted that across societies sex relations between betrothed persons are more restricted than before betrothal where large amounts of wealth are transferred and less restricted where wealth transfer is minimal" (327)Rosenblatt, Paul C. - Wealth transfer and restrictions on sexual relations during betrothal, 1969 - 2 Variables

    Authors use an exhange theory perspective to explain differences in sex restrictions during betrothal. Results indicate a positive association between the amount of wealth transferred and sex restrictions during betrothal.

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  8. "Individuals [in societies where there is] inadequate satisfaction of early oral . . . needs are more concerned with affection as adults than are those who have been adequately satisfied" (336)Rosenblatt, Paul C. - A cross cultural study of child rearing and romantic love, 1966 - 2 Variables

    This study examines the relationship between satisfaction of early oral and dependence needs and concern with affection in adulthood. Data showed significant support for an association between the satisfaction of early oral needs (but not the satisfaction of dependence needs) and concern for affection in adulthood.

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  9. The rate of remarriage will be more strongly associated with tie-breaking customs where levirate remarriage is practiced (219).Rosenblatt, Paul C. - Breaking ties with deceased spouse, 1976 - 3 Variables

    This paper examines death customs meant to break ties with a deceased spouse. The authors propose that remarriage rates are higher where these tie-breaking customs are practiced and that this association is stronger where sororate or levirate remarriage is practiced. Empirical support is found for these hypotheses.

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  10. "Freedom of choice of spouse is associated with greater male-female contact. . . . Freedom of choice is also associated with greater romantic love as a basis of marriage . . ." (689)Rosenblatt, Paul C. - Courtship patterns associated with freedom of choice of spouse, 1972 - 3 Variables

    This article investigates several correlates of freedom of choice of spouse, including general male-female contact and antagonism in premarital male-female interaction. Particular attention is paid to dances in the role of making contact with a spouse.

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