Found 2542 Hypotheses across 255 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. In a subsample excluding societies that are matrilocal and have less than occasional warfare, father's sleeping distance will be a better predictor of homicide and assault (305).Ember, Carol R. - Father absence and male aggression: a re-examination of the comparative evidence, 2002 - 4 Variables

    This paper supports Beatrice B. Whiting's (1965) sex-identity conflict hypothesis which suggests a relationship between males' early identification with their mothers and male violence. Authors find that, in addition to socialization aggression, frequency of homicide/assault is significantly related to father-infant sleeping distance, particularly when residence is not matrilocal and/or warfare is more than occasional.

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  2. There will be a relationship between use of corporal punishment and frequency of homicide/assault (305).Ember, Carol R. - Father absence and male aggression: a re-examination of the comparative evidence, 2002 - 2 Variables

    This paper supports Beatrice B. Whiting's (1965) sex-identity conflict hypothesis which suggests a relationship between males' early identification with their mothers and male violence. Authors find that, in addition to socialization aggression, frequency of homicide/assault is significantly related to father-infant sleeping distance, particularly when residence is not matrilocal and/or warfare is more than occasional.

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  3. Frequency of warfare will be related to parental hostility, overall parental warmth, father-infant sleeping proximity, and socialization for aggression in boys in late childhood (632)Ember, Carol R. - War, socialization, and interpersonal violence: a cross-cultural study, 1994 - 5 Variables

    This study explores several correlates of interpersonal violence. Multiple regression analysis suggests that socialization for aggression in boys in late childhood is the strongest predictor of higher rates of homicide and assault. Path analysis suggests that socialization for aggression is a consequence, not a cause, of war.

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  4. In a multiple regression analysis comparing the strongest predictors of violence, warfare will be a significant predictor of homicide/assault (15).Ember, Carol R. - Violence in the ethnographic record: results of cross-cultural research on w..., 1997 - 6 Variables

    This paper reviews the results of the author's cross-cultural studies of war and aggression and their implications for prehistory.

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  5. More father-infant sleeping distance will be positively associated with warfare frequency (107).Ember, Carol R. - War and socialization of children: comparing two evolutionary models, 2007 - 2 Variables

    This article presents two evolutionary models that may explain relationships between war and socialization of children: the "environmentally contingent reproductive strategy" (ECRS) model put forward by Draper and Harpending (1982), and a model put forward by Carol and Melvin Ember. Results do not provide support for the hypotheses involving father-infant sleeping proximity derived from the ECRS model. The authors also find some inconsistencies with their own model.

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  6. Aggression training will be positively associated with frequencies of homicide, assault, and war (630).Ember, Carol R. - War, socialization, and interpersonal violence: a cross-cultural study, 1994 - 3 Variables

    This study explores several correlates of interpersonal violence. Multiple regression analysis suggests that socialization for aggression in boys in late childhood is the strongest predictor of higher rates of homicide and assault. Path analysis suggests that socialization for aggression is a consequence, not a cause, of war.

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  7. More father-infant sleeping distance will be positively associated with pathogen stress (107).Ember, Carol R. - War and socialization of children: comparing two evolutionary models, 2007 - 2 Variables

    This article presents two evolutionary models that may explain relationships between war and socialization of children: the "environmentally contingent reproductive strategy" (ECRS) model put forward by Draper and Harpending (1982), and a model put forward by Carol and Melvin Ember. Results do not provide support for the hypotheses involving father-infant sleeping proximity derived from the ECRS model. The authors also find some inconsistencies with their own model.

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  8. More father-infant sleeping distance will be positively associated with resource unpredictability (107).Ember, Carol R. - War and socialization of children: comparing two evolutionary models, 2007 - 2 Variables

    This article presents two evolutionary models that may explain relationships between war and socialization of children: the "environmentally contingent reproductive strategy" (ECRS) model put forward by Draper and Harpending (1982), and a model put forward by Carol and Melvin Ember. Results do not provide support for the hypotheses involving father-infant sleeping proximity derived from the ECRS model. The authors also find some inconsistencies with their own model.

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  9. In a multiple regression, father-infant sleeping distance will be associated with warfare frequency, marrying enemies, and polygyny (108).Ember, Carol R. - War and socialization of children: comparing two evolutionary models, 2007 - 4 Variables

    This article presents two evolutionary models that may explain relationships between war and socialization of children: the "environmentally contingent reproductive strategy" (ECRS) model put forward by Draper and Harpending (1982), and a model put forward by Carol and Melvin Ember. Results do not provide support for the hypotheses involving father-infant sleeping proximity derived from the ECRS model. The authors also find some inconsistencies with their own model.

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  10. ". . . there is a high positive relationship between prolonged, exclusive mother-child sleeping arrangements and frequency of Personal Crime" (298).Bacon, Margaret K. - A cross-cultural study of correlates of crime, 1963 - 2 Variables

    Causal factors to the development of crime are examined. Frequency of theft and personal crime are tested against these causal factors in a search for correlations.

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