Found 42 Hypotheses across 5 Pages (0.001 seconds)
  1. The "exclusivity gain" model (an N-G-K-I trajectory) will best predict the evolution of land tenure norms (314)Kushnick, Geoff - The sequential evolution of land tenure norms, 2014 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the authors utilize phylogenetic methods to reconstruct the evolution of land tenure norms among 97 Austronesian societies. They coded these norms for each society as none (N), group (G), group-kin (K), and individual (I). After formulating various models of evolution through these various stages, they used Bayesian analysis to determine support for each. They conclude with remarks about this type of evolutionary phylogenetic research as a form of "virtual archeology."

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  2. The "alternative" model (an N-I-G-K trajectory) will best predict the evolution of land tenure norms (314)Kushnick, Geoff - The sequential evolution of land tenure norms, 2014 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the authors utilize phylogenetic methods to reconstruct the evolution of land tenure norms among 97 Austronesian societies. They coded these norms for each society as none (N), group (G), group-kin (K), and individual (I). After formulating various models of evolution through these various stages, they used Bayesian analysis to determine support for each. They conclude with remarks about this type of evolutionary phylogenetic research as a form of "virtual archeology."

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  3. The "full" model (where all four land tenure norms are transitioned to and from freely) will best predict the evolution of land tenure norms (314)Kushnick, Geoff - The sequential evolution of land tenure norms, 2014 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the authors utilize phylogenetic methods to reconstruct the evolution of land tenure norms among 97 Austronesian societies. They coded these norms for each society as none (N), group (G), group-kin (K), and individual (I). After formulating various models of evolution through these various stages, they used Bayesian analysis to determine support for each. They conclude with remarks about this type of evolutionary phylogenetic research as a form of "virtual archeology."

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  4. The "no loss" model (where all transitions to are possible except back to N) will best predict the evolution of land tenure norms (314)Kushnick, Geoff - The sequential evolution of land tenure norms, 2014 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the authors utilize phylogenetic methods to reconstruct the evolution of land tenure norms among 97 Austronesian societies. They coded these norms for each society as none (N), group (G), group-kin (K), and individual (I). After formulating various models of evolution through these various stages, they used Bayesian analysis to determine support for each. They conclude with remarks about this type of evolutionary phylogenetic research as a form of "virtual archeology."

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  5. The "loss for change model" (where there are free transitions to and from all forms of tenure norms with the stipulation that they pass through N) will best predict the evolution of land tenure norms (314)Kushnick, Geoff - The sequential evolution of land tenure norms, 2014 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the authors utilize phylogenetic methods to reconstruct the evolution of land tenure norms among 97 Austronesian societies. They coded these norms for each society as none (N), group (G), group-kin (K), and individual (I). After formulating various models of evolution through these various stages, they used Bayesian analysis to determine support for each. They conclude with remarks about this type of evolutionary phylogenetic research as a form of "virtual archeology."

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  6. The "gain from none" model (where all norms are can emerge from N, but cannot regress) will best predict the evolution of land tenure norms (314)Kushnick, Geoff - The sequential evolution of land tenure norms, 2014 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the authors utilize phylogenetic methods to reconstruct the evolution of land tenure norms among 97 Austronesian societies. They coded these norms for each society as none (N), group (G), group-kin (K), and individual (I). After formulating various models of evolution through these various stages, they used Bayesian analysis to determine support for each. They conclude with remarks about this type of evolutionary phylogenetic research as a form of "virtual archeology."

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  7. The "unstable group" model (where all transitions are possible, except G can only emerge from N) will best predict the evolution of land tenure norms (314)Kushnick, Geoff - The sequential evolution of land tenure norms, 2014 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the authors utilize phylogenetic methods to reconstruct the evolution of land tenure norms among 97 Austronesian societies. They coded these norms for each society as none (N), group (G), group-kin (K), and individual (I). After formulating various models of evolution through these various stages, they used Bayesian analysis to determine support for each. They conclude with remarks about this type of evolutionary phylogenetic research as a form of "virtual archeology."

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  8. The "kin-group" model (where all transitions are allowed, expect from K) will best predict the evolution of land tenure norms (314)Kushnick, Geoff - The sequential evolution of land tenure norms, 2014 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the authors utilize phylogenetic methods to reconstruct the evolution of land tenure norms among 97 Austronesian societies. They coded these norms for each society as none (N), group (G), group-kin (K), and individual (I). After formulating various models of evolution through these various stages, they used Bayesian analysis to determine support for each. They conclude with remarks about this type of evolutionary phylogenetic research as a form of "virtual archeology."

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  9. The "corporate model" (where all transitions are possible, except once K or I arise there can only be changes between them) will best predict the evolution of land tenure norms (314)Kushnick, Geoff - The sequential evolution of land tenure norms, 2014 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the authors utilize phylogenetic methods to reconstruct the evolution of land tenure norms among 97 Austronesian societies. They coded these norms for each society as none (N), group (G), group-kin (K), and individual (I). After formulating various models of evolution through these various stages, they used Bayesian analysis to determine support for each. They conclude with remarks about this type of evolutionary phylogenetic research as a form of "virtual archeology."

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  10. There is a positive association between male aggression and societies with polygyny and a high variance in the number of wives.Carter, Tara-Lyn - Male aggressiveness as intrasexual contest competition in a cross-cultural s..., 2018 - 7 Variables

    The present study tests the theory that intrasexual selection or male attraction may explain variation in male aggression in a sample of 78 societies. Measures of intrasexual selection include: male subsistence, male war mortality, polygyny, sex ratio, and wives variance. The authors claim support for the theory.

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