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  1. Comparative phylogenetic analyses uncover the ancient roots of Indo-European folktalesDa Silva, Sara Graça - Royal Society open science, 2016 - 2 Hypotheses

    The authors compare language phylogenies and spatial distributions with folktale frequencies of Indo-European peoples in order to reconstruct their cultural transmission. A stronger association is found between folktale frequency and language phylogeny than has been proposed in earlier literature studies, indicating that vertical transmission is more influential on folktale distribution than horizontal transmission through spatial proximity. Finally, the frequencies of certain folktales appear to trace the ancestral divergences of Indo-European languages to a much deeper level than previously though, suggesting that folktales are representative of broader features of culture, rather than recent literary inventions.

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  2. Strategy in games and folk talesRoberts, John M. - Journal of Social Psychology, 1963 - 5 Hypotheses

    This study investigates the strategic mode of competition in both games of strategy and folk talkes. Various significant relationships between games of strategy, folktales, social complexity, and child rearing variables are observed.

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  3. A cross-cultural study of folk-tale content and drinkingMcClelland, David C. - The Drinking Man, 1972 - 8 Hypotheses

    This book chapter tests new and pre-existing theories (Horton, Field, Bacon et al.) for the cause of variation in drinking across cultures. Folktale content is used to test psychological variables more directly than has been done previously. Folktale content is analyzed programmatically with an acknowledged error level of up to one-third. Results lend support to Field's 1962 theory that loose social organization facilitates drinking.

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  4. Cultural complexity and demography: The case of folktakesAcerbi, Alberto - Evolution and Human Behavior, 2017 - 3 Hypotheses

    Acerbi, Kendal, and Tehrani examine the relationship between population size and cultural complexity as measured by a non-technological cultural domain: folktales. Three measures of complexity for folktales are analyzed, 1) number of tale types, 2) number of narrative motifs, and 3) number of traits in variants of two international folktales. Findings suggest that the relationship between cultural complexity and population may depend on the domain, as different domains vary in cultural maintenance and transmission.

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  5. National motives and psychogenic death ratesLester, David - Science, 1968 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study investigates possible relationships between the need for achievement and power (as measured in folktales) with rates of suicide and homicide in preindustrial societies. Analysis suggests that homicide is not associated with either the need for achievement or power, but suicide is positively associated with the need for power.

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  6. Femme fatale and status fatale: a cross-cultural perspectiveJankowiak, William - Cross-Cultural Research, 2000 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study documents the phenomenon of the 'femme fatale' (a dangerous woman) and 'status fatale' (a dangerous man) cross-culturally. The 'femme fatale' motif is practically universal. Data supports the idea that emotional involvement, rather than sexual gratification, was the primary motivation for seeking out a stranger of the opposite sex. A literature review is provided.

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  7. A cross-cultural study of the effects of environmental unpredictability on aggression in folktalesCohen, Alex - American Anthropologist, 1990 - 2 Hypotheses

    Using a psychoanalytic-materialist approach, the author examines the possible effects of environmental unpredictability on the prevalence of unprovoked aggression by characters in folktales.

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  8. Power and inhibition: a revision of the magical potency theoryWanner, Eric - The drinking man, 1972 - 3 Hypotheses

    This book chapter (4) follows up suggestions from a previous chapter (3) by McClelland et.al. that in non-solidary societies heavy drinking is associated with conflict about personal power and alcohol provides a way of acting out impulses aimed at impacting others. Support was found for this theory using an analysis of words in folktales.

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  9. Semes and genes in africaHewlett, Barry S. - Current Anthropology, 2002 - 4 Hypotheses

    Genetic, linguistic, and geographic data can be used to explain the distribution of cultural units ("semes") and to understand the evolutionary mechanisms of culture. Three broad models of cultural transmission attempt to explain why cultures share semes: (1) Cultural diffusion, emphasizing horizontal transmission. (2) Local adaptation, where trail-and-error learning leads to the independent adoption of semes by different peoples living in similar environments. (3) Demic diffusion, which emphasizes vertical and frequency-dependent transmission. Authors test the explanatory power of each model using cultural, genetic, linguistic and geographic data from 36 African cultures.

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  10. Co-occurrence of ostensive communication and generalizable knowledge in forager storytelling: cross-cultural evidence of teaching in forager societiesSugiyama, Michelle S. - Human Nature, 2021 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article examined the presence of ostensive-communicative behaviors in educational storytelling within foraging cultures. Ostensive communication includes prosody and gestures used to direct attention to something or someone. The author analyzed 14 behaviors of ostensive communication and tested whether they co-occur with the transmission of knowledge in storytelling. All 53 forager cultures examined demonstrated the use of 2 or more of those communicative behaviors in oral storytelling. This supports the author’s claim of ostensive-communicative behavior as a universal pedagogical tool in forager cultures.

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