Found 810 Documents across 81 Pages (0.009 seconds)
  1. The influence of diet on morning sickness: a cross-cultural studyMinturn, Leigh - Medical Anthropology, 1984 - 7 Hypotheses

    This article proposes that differences in diet may account for the presence or absence of morning sickness in a society. Data suggest that morning sickness is not a universal symptom of pregnancy, and there are significant differences in foods consumed where morning sickness does not occur, including more maize, fats, and vegetables.

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  2. Reproductive immunosuppression and diet: an evolutionary perspective on pregnancy sickness and meat consumptionFessler, Daniel M.T. - Current Anthropology, 2002 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article examines meat avoidance during pregnancy as an evolutionary adaptation. Data suggests that during pregnancy, meat avoidance is significantly more common cross-culturally than other types of food avoidance. The timing of meat avoidance, the presence of meat-borne pathogens, and sensory and ingestive changes in early pregnancy are also discussed.

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  3. Food habits in non-industrial societiesMoore, Frank W. - Dimensions of Nutrition, 1970 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study reviews the dietary habits of South and East Asia, Oceania, the Middle East, Africa, and Latin America. Ethnographic descriptions and raw data are presented. The author concludes with several observed patterns: humans are carnivorous and become vegetarian by force of circumstance; taboos are more commonly used on meat than on plants; eating patterns conform to economic base; people tend to extract a fairly high percentage of available resources from their environment.

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  4. A Cross-Cultural Summary: Premarital Sexual RelationsTextor, Robert B. - A Cross-Cultural Summary, 1967 - 11 Hypotheses

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural findings on premarital sexual relations pertaining to cultural, environmental, psychological, and social phenomena.

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  5. Lot's wife and the old salt: cross-cultural comparisons of attitudes toward salt in relation to dietParman, Susan - Cross-Cultural Research, 2002 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article examines attitudes toward salt as a cultural mechanism to regulate salt consumption, finding that meat-eating societies (associated with higher salt consumption) have more negative proverbs and other forms of cultural expression associated with salt, and societies with plant-based diets (associated with lower salt consumption) have more positive cultural expressions.

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  6. A Cross-Cultural Summary: Hunter-GatherersTextor, Robert B. - , 1967 - 9 Hypotheses

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural findings on societies where subsistence is primarily by 'food gathering' which includes hunting, fishing, and gathering.

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  7. Effects of Evolution, Ecology, and Economy on Human Diet: Insights from Hunter-Gatherers and Other Small-Scale SocietiesPontzer, Herman - Annual Review of Nutrition, 2021 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study, primarily a review on the evolution of the human diet, also includes a small study on the distribution of meat-eating and its relationship with climate and cultural factors, namely subsistence type. The authors find that societies with subsistence strategies that prioritize fishing, hunting, or pastoralism also tend to consume more animal products, whereas those that focus on agriculture have more plant-based diets. The authors argue that these small-scale societies have a healthier approach to diet than industrialized societies regardless of their subsistence type or meat consumption.

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  8. Meat is good to tabooFessler, Daniel M.T. - Journal of Cognition and Culture, 2003 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study finds that meat taboos are more common than non-meat taboos cross-culturally. Several explanations for meat taboos are discussed. Authors advocate an evolutionary understanding of food taboos.

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  9. Using drug foods to capture and enhance labor performance: a cross-cultural perspectiveJankowiak, William - Current Anthropology, 1996 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study examines the relationship between drug foods and colonialism in relation to labor and trade. Relationships were found between political complexity, subsistence type, and the use of drug foods as labor and trade enhancers and inducers.

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  10. A Cross-Cultural Summary: Male Initiation RitesTextor, Robert B. - , 1967 - 14 Hypotheses

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural male initiation rites findings pertaining to cultural, environmental, psychological, and social phenomena.

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