Found 692 Documents across 70 Pages (0.008 seconds)
  1. Avoidance, social affiliation, and the incest tabooSweetser, Dorrian Apple - Ethnology, 1966 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article examines parent-in-law avoidance in non-industrial societies. The author suggests that in-law avoidance is associated with characteristics of kinship structure, such as lineality, residence and family type. A psychological interpretation is also offered. Results support hypotheses relating to kinship structure.

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  2. The oedipus complex: cross-cultural evidenceStephens, William N. - , 1962 - 21 Hypotheses

    The author attempts to test the "Oedipus-complex" hypothesis--the psychoanalytic idea that under certain conditions (such as the long-post partum sex taboo) males are sexually attracted to their mothers and as a consequence certain fears and anxiety are generaated. The hypothesis is tested at the societal-level using ethnographic data.

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  3. Sibling terminology and cross-sex behaviorNerlove, Sara - American Anthropologist, 1967 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article examines variation in kinship terminology. The authors develop a new typology of kinds of kinship terminologies, and they propose that terminologies will distinguish siblings of the same and opposite gender when there is a cultural emphasis on cross-sex relations. Empirical analysis supports that a prolonged post-partum sex taboo (rather than sibling avoidance) predicts the presence of a primary cross-parallel component in sibling terminology.

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  4. Correlates of the long post-partum taboo: a cross-cultural studySaucier, Jean-Francois - Current Anthropology, 1972 - 13 Hypotheses

    This study investigates correlates of the post-partum sex taboo. Empirical analysis identifies several predictors, from extensive agriculture to localized kin groups. The authors suggest that the taboo imposes a burden on women and unmarried or monogamous young men, and it is best maintained in a community in which elders are in firm control and married women are considered outsiders due to village exogamy.

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  5. Significance of the father for the son's masculine identityKitahara, Michio - Cross-Cultural Research, 1975 - 9 Hypotheses

    The significance of the son's insufficient contact with his father during infancy in regard to circumcision and segregation is examined. This article suggests that it is not the long postpartum sexual taboo but the separation of each co-wife that is instrumental in bringing about circumcision and segregation. Expands on Kitahara 1974.

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  6. Cross-sex patterns of kin behavior: a commentGoody, Jack - Behavior Science Research, 1974 - 4 Hypotheses

    This paper examines the behavior between close kin and affines of the opposite sex. The authors "point to certain differences between continental areas that are related to specific social factors, including the structure of descent groups and the nature of marriage arrangements."

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  7. Cross-sex patterns of kin behaviorMurdock, George Peter - Ethnology, 1971 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study re-examines patterns of cross-sex kin relationships using new ethnographic data. The author looks specifically at cross-sex kin relationship in relation to marriage rules.

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  8. Totem and taboo, purity and danger…and fads and fashion in the study of pollution rulesCarroll, Michael P. - Behavior Science Research, 1983 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article examines three theories regarding the existence of pollution rules. Results show support for a psychological theory put forward by Freud that predicts a relationship between father-child contact, post-partum sex taboos, and menstrual taboos.

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  9. Post-partum sex taboosMurdock, George Peter - Paideuma, 1967 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article examines two hypotheses concerning the length of the post-partum sex taboo. Analysis suggests that both animal husbandry (with consumption of domestic animals’ milk) and monogamy (which restricts men’s options for sexual partners) are inversely associated with the length of the post-partum sex taboo.

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  10. Sorcery, sin and the superego: a cross-cultural study of some mechanisms of social controlWhiting, John W.M. - Cross-Cultural Approaches: Readings in Comparative Research, 1967 - 6 Hypotheses

    This chapter examines how sorcery, sin, and the superego function in societies to uphold taboos and other forms of social control. The author also explores the child-rearing conditions that are necessary to produce and maintain these cultural mechanisms. Several hypotheses are tested and all are supported.

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