Found 525 Documents across 53 Pages (0.01 seconds)
  1. Rhythmicity or sonority: response to ember and ember's "cross-language predictors of consonant-vowel syllables"Munroe, Robert L. - American Anthropologist, 2000 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article presents a reanalysis of a previous study on language rhythm and consonant-vowel syllables by Ember and Ember (2000). Communicative efficiency, climate, baby-holding, literacy, and mean number of syllables per word were all considered as factors in consonant-vowel syllable use.

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  2. The importance of gossip across societies: correlations with institutionalizationDemerath, Loren - Cross-Cultural Research, 2015 - 5 Hypotheses

    This article investigates the theory that gossip, as a method of obtaining information and creating a meaningful social environment, increases in importance with society complexity. Forms of gossip in highly "modernized" societies, which are rare in the cross-cultural sample, are discussed. In addition, the authors explore associations between gender autonomy and the importance of gossip.

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  3. Human grooming in comparative perspective: People in six small‐scale societies groom less but socialize just as much as expected for a typical primateJaeggi, Adrian V. - American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 2017 - 2 Hypotheses

    Grooming of conspecifics is thought to play an important social role among nonhuman primates, but the function and relative importance of such grooming among humans is unknown. Here the authors compare time spent grooming and conversing among six small-scale societies with grooming data from 69 nonhuman primate species. They test the hypothesis that conversation evolved among humans as an alternative way to obtain the social benefits (such as building and maintaining social alliances) of grooming in large groups.

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  4. Human sound systems are shaped by post-Neolithic changes in bite configurationBlasi, D.E. - Science, 2019 - 3 Hypotheses

    Using ethnography, historical linguistics, paleoanthropology, and speech biomechanics, the present study examines the relationship between labiodentals and the post-Neolithic period with the introduction of agriculture and softer diets. The results offer support for the linguist, Charles Hockett's, hypothesis that the shift in bite configuration in the post-Neolithic period, as well as the persistence of overbite and overjet, facilitates and makes the articulation of labiodentals more prevalent. Using cross-cultural comparison, findings also reveal that societies that produce their food are more likely to evolve and keep labiodentals than those that are not food-producing. Contact with other societiesis also a mode by which societies gain labiodentals. Lastly, the expansion of agricultural and food processing technology over time has been imperative to labiodental articulations.

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  5. Extramarital sex norms in cross-cultural perspectiveBroude, Gwen J. - Cross-Cultural Research, 1980 - 6 Hypotheses

    This study examines the double standard regarding extramarital norms for men and women in relation to other sociocultural factors. Results suggest that a double standard is significantly related to post-partum sex taboos, hypermasculinity, and father absence.

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  6. A sylistic analysis of speakingLomax, Alan - Language in Society, 1977 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study seeks correlations between social variables and linguistic variables, including the following ten speech patterns: repetitiveness, long-windedness, drawl, charm and variability, amount of pausing, sharing of air time, tension, noisy qualities, breath control, and forcefulness. Many associations are discussed, particularly those involving societal complexity, sex roles, and singing and dancing.

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  7. A Cross-Cultural Summary: PolygynyTextor, Robert B. - , 1967 - 21 Hypotheses

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural findings on polygyny pertaining to cultural, environmental, psychological, and social phenomena.

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  8. Population growth, society, and culture: an inventory of cross-culturally tested causal hypothesesSipes, Richard G. - , 1980 - 51 Hypotheses

    This book examines population growth rate and its correlates by testing 274 hypotheses (derived from multiple theories) with an 18-society sample. Forty-one of these hypotheses were significant at the .05 level, leading the author to accept these relationships as reflective of the real world. The 274 hypotheses are grouped into 51 broader hypotheses, and marked by (*) where relationships are significant as designated by the author or by significance p < 0.05.

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  9. Cross-language predictors of consonant-vowel syllablesEmber, Melvin - American Anthropologist, 2000 - 5 Hypotheses

    This study tests predictors of consonant-vowel prevalence cross-culturally. Authors reevaluate the findings of Munroe et. al. (1996) and also test a new variable—baby-holding—for its relationship to CV score. Results suggest that baby-holding is a significant predictor of CV score.

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  10. Rethinking the couvade: cross-cultural evidenceBroude, Gwen J. - American Anthropologist, 1988 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article examines several possible correlates of the couvade. Results suggest that father presence, rather than the expected father absence, is significantly associated with the couvade.

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