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  1. Folktale transmission in the arctic provides evidence for high bandwidth social learning among hunter–gatherer groupsRoss, Robert M. - Evolution and Human Behavior, 2016 - 4 Hypotheses

    The myths, legends, and folktales of nearby groups tend to more alike than those of more distant groups. Three competing models attempt to explain this distribution of cultural traits: (1) vertical transmission, (2) horizontal transmission, and (3) independent innovation. The authors examine 18 Arctic hunter-gatherer groups to quantify the extent to which geographic distance, cultural ancestry, and effective population size predict overlap in folktale inventories.

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  2. Strategy in games and folk talesRoberts, John M. - Journal of Social Psychology, 1963 - 5 Hypotheses

    This study investigates the strategic mode of competition in both games of strategy and folk talkes. Various significant relationships between games of strategy, folktales, social complexity, and child rearing variables are observed.

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  3. A cross-cultural study of folk-tale content and drinkingMcClelland, David C. - The Drinking Man, 1972 - 8 Hypotheses

    This book chapter tests new and pre-existing theories (Horton, Field, Bacon et al.) for the cause of variation in drinking across cultures. Folktale content is used to test psychological variables more directly than has been done previously. Folktale content is analyzed programmatically with an acknowledged error level of up to one-third. Results lend support to Field's 1962 theory that loose social organization facilitates drinking.

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  4. Sex differences in mate choice criteria are reflected in folktales from around the world and in historical european literatureGottschall, Jonathan - Evolution and Human Behavior, 2004 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article expands on Buss's (1989) study of the differences in male and female mate preferences in Western folktale characters by adding non-Western data. The new results show support for Buss's original findings.

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  5. A cross-cultural study of the effects of environmental unpredictability on aggression in folktalesCohen, Alex - American Anthropologist, 1990 - 2 Hypotheses

    Using a psychoanalytic-materialist approach, the author examines the possible effects of environmental unpredictability on the prevalence of unprovoked aggression by characters in folktales.

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  6. Cultural complexity and demography: The case of folktakesAcerbi, Alberto - Evolution and Human Behavior, 2017 - 3 Hypotheses

    Acerbi, Kendal, and Tehrani examine the relationship between population size and cultural complexity as measured by a non-technological cultural domain: folktales. Three measures of complexity for folktales are analyzed, 1) number of tale types, 2) number of narrative motifs, and 3) number of traits in variants of two international folktales. Findings suggest that the relationship between cultural complexity and population may depend on the domain, as different domains vary in cultural maintenance and transmission.

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  7. Power and inhibition: a revision of the magical potency theoryWanner, Eric - The drinking man, 1972 - 3 Hypotheses

    This book chapter (4) follows up suggestions from a previous chapter (3) by McClelland et.al. that in non-solidary societies heavy drinking is associated with conflict about personal power and alcohol provides a way of acting out impulses aimed at impacting others. Support was found for this theory using an analysis of words in folktales.

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  8. Male security and art style in traditional societiesGray, J. Patrick - The Journal of Social Psychology, 1981 - 6 Hypotheses

    This paper suggests that Fischer's (1961) "male security" variable is not adequate. Cross-cultural analyses suggest that male security in the realm of father-son interaction may be more important than male security in the realm of heterosexual interaction in explaining the line shape preference of a society.

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  9. National motives and psychogenic death ratesLester, David - Science, 1968 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study investigates possible relationships between the need for achievement and power (as measured in folktales) with rates of suicide and homicide in preindustrial societies. Analysis suggests that homicide is not associated with either the need for achievement or power, but suicide is positively associated with the need for power.

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  10. Femme fatale and status fatale: a cross-cultural perspectiveJankowiak, William - Cross-Cultural Research, 2000 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study documents the phenomenon of the 'femme fatale' (a dangerous woman) and 'status fatale' (a dangerous man) cross-culturally. The 'femme fatale' motif is practically universal. Data supports the idea that emotional involvement, rather than sexual gratification, was the primary motivation for seeking out a stranger of the opposite sex. A literature review is provided.

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