Found 821 Documents across 83 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. A cross-cultural study of expressive and instrumental role complementarity in the familyCrano, Joel - American Sociological Review, 1978 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study tests the claim that male and female investment in the socioemotional and economic aspects of family life are inversely related. Results suggest that this hypothesis is not supported, although a significant inverse relationship between male and female infant care does exist.

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  2. Paternal confidence and paternal investment: a cross cultural test of a sociobiological hypothesisGaulin, Steven J.C. - Ethnology and Sociobiology, 1980 - 2 Hypotheses

    Using paternal investment theory, the authors examine the relationship between paternal confidence and paternal investment in humans.

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  3. Parenting and cultures of risk: a comparative analysis of infidelity, aggression, and witchcraftQuinlan, Robert J. - American Anthropologist, 2007 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study tests a broad "risk response" hypothesis: environmental risk can reduce parents' involvement and care which, through its effects on children's behavioral strategies later in life, ultimately produces a larger cultural model favoring risky behavior. Examinations of extramarital sex, aggression, theft, and witchcraft support this hypothesis, leading the authors to suggest that child development is the underpinning of cultural adaptation in the face of environmental change.

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  4. Adolescence: an anthropological inquirySchlegel, Alice - , 1991 - 81 Hypotheses

    This book discusses the characteristics of adolescence cross-culturally and examines the differences in the adolescent experience for males and females. Several relationships are tested in order to gain an understanding of cross-cultural patterns in adolescence.

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  5. Population density in cross-cultural perspectiveLevinson, David - American Ethnologist, 1979 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article investigates how population density affects social behavior, particularly whether it is a cause of stress in humans that manifests in pathological behavior or mistreatment of children. Analysis indicates that population density is not a cause of these behaviors, and with some variables (such as with divorce and sexual anxiety), there is a negative association with population density.

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  6. Paternity Uncertainty and Parent–Offspring Conflict Explain Restrictions on Female Premarital Sex across SocietiesŠaffa, Gabriel - Human Nature, 2022 - 11 Hypotheses

    This study tests competing theories about whether it is men, women, or parents who benefit most from restricting female premarital sex (FPS) in a global sample of 128 non-industrial societies. The study found support for the idea that multiple parties benefit from restrictions on FPS -- specifically FPS is more restricted in societies intolerant of extramarital sex and where men transfer property to their children (male control), as well as where marriages are arranged by parents (parental control). They also found that major predictors of FPS appear to be paternity uncertainty and parent-offspring conflict. Furthermore, the study found that multiple factors such as social roles, rather than stereotyped sex roles, are a more useful approach in understanding FPS restrictions and these restrictions.

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  7. Fathers' roles in hunter-gatherer and other small-scale culturesHewlett, Barry S. - The Role of the Father in Child Development, 2010 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study evaluates recent research on the roles of fathers in child development in hunting-gathering, simple farming, and pastoral communities around the world. The authors review previously conducted studies as well as highlight the varying theoretical approaches that many of these previous studies have taken.

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  8. Paternal investment and the human mating systemMarlowe, Frank W. - Behavioural Processes, 2000 - 7 Hypotheses

    This article explores the interrelated roles of male parental investment (males' infant/child care and resource provisioning) and male-male competition (variation in male status) on the degree of monogamy or polygyny in a society. Marlowe argues that Degree of parental investment affects females' interest in resource-shopping versus gene-shopping. Also discussed is the idea that male-male competition affects males' inclination toward harem-defense or coercive polygyny. Particular attention is paid to variation in parental investment and male stratification across subsistence types.

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  9. Bride theft and raiding for wives in cross-cultural perspectiveAyres, Barbara - Anthropological Quarterly, 1974 - 12 Hypotheses

    This article seeks to examine the distribution and frequency of bride-theft. Tylor's (1889) findings between various forms of marriage by capture and certain other social instituions are confirmed.

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  10. Cultural dimensions: a factor analysis of textor's a cross-cultural summaryStewart, Robert A. C. - Behavior Science Notes, 1972 - 12 Hypotheses

    This article uses factor analysis to identify the key variables underlying the many cross-cultural associations reported by Textor (1967). Twelve factors are identified.

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