Found 938 Documents across 94 Pages (0.055 seconds)
  1. Climate, Climate Change and the Global Diversity of Human HousesDunn, Robert R. - Evolutionary Human Sciences, 2023 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study uses macroecological approaches to test the impact of climate, social environment, inter-group borrowing and cultural history on vernacular house architecture among 1140 societies. The authors suggest that certain features will be influenced: wall materials, ground plan, roof shape, and floor placement. They use mixed binary and multinominal regressions models to test these predictions. The results strongly support that climatic drivers, cultural continuity, and inter-group borrowing predict three out of the four features: wall materials, roof shape, and floor placement. Social drivers are a strong predictor of every feature tested.

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  2. Inferences from the shape of dwellingsWhiting, John W.M. - Settlement Archaeology, 1968 - 5 Hypotheses

    This study examines several correlates of the shape of floor plans of dwellings. Authors find that "whether a culture is settled or nomadic, the form of its family and the presence or absence of status distinctions are related to its house type, and the house types can in turn be inferred from the floor plan." Curvilinear houses are associated with polygyny and nomadism and rectilinear houses are associated with sedentarism, extended families, and status distinctions.

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  3. House types and settlement patternsRobbins, Michael C. - Minnesota Archaeologist, 1966 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article proposes that ground plans may be used as a criterion for determining the relative permanence of settlement patterns in archaelogical societies. Results suggest that impermanent settlements and small community size are significantly associated with circular ground plans and that permanent settlements with larger community sizes are significantly associated with rectangular ground plans.

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  4. Architecture as a material correlate of mobility strategies: some implications for archeological interpretationDiehl, Michael W. - Behavior Science Research, 1992 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article investigates a possible association between mobility strategy and dwelling construction. The author tests a broad hypothesis that planned duration of use for a structure is positively associated with the investment costs in building a dwelling. Some operational hypotheses are supported; others are not.

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  5. Mobility, housing, and environment: a comparative studyBinford, Lewis R. - Journal of Anthropological Research, 1990 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article examines housing, mobility, and subsistence among hunter-gatherers. Several statistical associations are supported. The author uses findings to evaluate the relative complexity of societies from the archaeological record.

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  6. Onstage and offstage sex: exploring a hypothesisMaxwell, Robert J. - Cornell Journal of Social Relations, 1967 - 4 Hypotheses

    The relationship between restrictions on premarital sex and the privacy of sexual practices is examined, using the degree of impenetrability of house materials as both a proxy and assumed cause for "offstage" or private sex. The author theorizes that permissive premarital sex norms are a response to open dwelling types which are themselves an adaptation to warm temperatures.

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  7. Effects of residential mobility on the ratio of average house floor area to average household size: implications for demographic reconstructions in archaeologyPorcic, Marko - Cross-Cultural Research, 2012 - 1 Hypotheses

    Examines whether nomadism affects the ratio of average house floor area to average household size.

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  8. Economic Systems of Foraging, Agricultural, and Industrial SocietiesFrederic L. Pryor - , 2005 - 26 Hypotheses

    The second and third parts of this book classify the economic systems of foraging and agricultural societies in the SCCS based on correlations between their institutions of property an distribution. These economic types are then examined for relationships with other social, political, demographic, and environmental factors in order to draw tentative conclusions regarding the origins of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. The fourth part of the book uses cross-national data to examine similar associations in industrial/service economies, and is not included here.

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  9. Cross-Cultural Correlates of the Ownership of Private Property: Two Samples of Murdock's DataRudmin, Floyd Webster - Journal of Socio-Economics, 1995 - 2 Hypotheses

    The present study aims to evaluate correlations of private property from two of Murdock's datasets, one of 147 societies (1981) and the other of 312 societies (1967). Altogether the author tested 146 variables coded by Murdock against variables regarding the ownership of land and of movables drawn from Murdock (1967), Simmons (1937), and Swanson (1960). In total, there were 51 statistically significant correlations between private property ownership and other variables. Additionally, the author summarizes the results from this article and the two that preceded it stating that throughout all of the correlations he ran, the practice of agriculture, the use of cereal grains, and the presence of castes and classes were the only variables that predicted private property in all of the datasets that were utilized.

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  10. Floor area and settlement populationNaroll, Raoul - American Antiquity, 1962 - 1 Hypotheses

    This paper discusses the relationship between floor area and settlement population.

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