Found 761 Documents across 77 Pages (0.012 seconds)
  1. A re-examination of the cross-cultural principles of task segregation and sex role differentiation in the familyCrano, Joel - American Sociological Review, 1975 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines Parsons' and Bales' proposition that a universal feature of social structure is gender sex role specialization of tasks. Results suggest that women contribute substantially to the subsistence economy across many domains, casting doubt on such universality.

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  2. Co-wife conflict and co-operationJankowiak, William - Ethnology, 2005 - 7 Hypotheses

    This article offers an exploratory study of the structural and psychological influences related co-wife conflict and cooperation.

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  3. Multiple predictors of contributions by women to agricultureBarry III, Herbert - Cross-Cultural Research, 2002 - 1 Hypotheses

    This is a preliminary study of predictors of female contribution to agriculture. Results suggest that several variables are significantly related to female contribution to agriculture rather than one dominant variable.

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  4. Cassava production and processing in a cross-cultural sample of african societiesRomanoff, Steven - Behavior Science Research, 1992 - 12 Hypotheses

    This exploratory study seeks to explain cassava production and processing in Africa by considering cultural, agronomic, and environmental data. After examining the descriptive results of the agricultural and social contexts of cassava use, the authors build upon Boserup's population density model (1965) to analyze their own hypothesized model of cassava's importance among the sampled societies.

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  5. Sexual dimorphism in stature and women's work: a phylogenetic cross-cultural analysisHolden, Clare - American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 1999 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article presents a phylogenetic approach to studying sexual dimorphism of stature. Results show a significant association between sexual division of labor and sexual dimorphism of stature.

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  6. Myths about hunter-gatherersEmber, Carol R. - Ethnology, 1978 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article challenges common assumptions about hunter-gatherers and demonstrates that previous ideas about residence, division of labor and warfare are not supported by the cross-cultural data.

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  7. The status of women in preindustrial societiesWhyte, Martin King - , 1978 - 23 Hypotheses

    This book is concerned with explaining variation in the status of women. The author, after measuring over 50 aspects of status, first concludes that status is not a unitary concept. Therefore the author looks at 10 different domains of status. Many traditional explanations are not supported; most support is found for the influence of social complexity which generally lowers female status.

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  8. Parental choice: what parents want in a son-in-law and a daughter-in-law across 67 pre-industrial societiesApostolou, Menelaos - British Journal of Psychology, 2010 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article examines differences in parental preference of potential in-laws across cultures. Results suggest that parents look for traits that will benefit themselves and their kin and that gender and subsistence type affects the traits that parents deem most important.

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  9. Toward a theory of the status of womenSanday, Peggy Reeves - American Anthropologist, 1973 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study tests an ecological-economic theory of female contribution to subsistence, focusing on subsistence type as a potential correlate. In an exploratory analysis, 28 independent variables (not all listed below) are examined. The relationship between female contribution to subsistence and female status is also examined.

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  10. Height and sexual dimorphism of stature among human societiesGray, J. Patrick - American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 1980 - 6 Hypotheses

    This article explores the relationship between sexual dimorphism of stature and variables of marriage, diet, subsistence and environment. Significant associations were found between security and plentifulness of food supply, protein availability, and sexual dimorphism of stature.

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