Found 1142 Documents across 115 Pages (0.046 seconds)
  1. The politics of birth practices: a strategic analysisPaige, Karen - American Sociological Review, 1973 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article examines cross-cultural variation in customary birth practices for men and women, testing a general hypothesis that birth practices represent tactics in negotiations over paternity. Data supports this hypothesis, and a series of related variables are tested in bivariate analysis and path analysis. Findings suggest that compensation demands at birth are associated with maternal restrictions from paternity-related agreements (e.g. maternal seclusion during birth), and fraternal interest groups are associated with the husband’s ritual involvement at birth (e.g. demonstration of the couvade).

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  2. Can Policy Change Culture? Government Pension Plans and Traditional Kinship PracticesBau, Natalie - American Economic Review, 2021 - 6 Hypotheses

    In this paper, the author examines the effects of recent pension policies in Indonesia and Ghana on the practice of matri- or patrilocality. She also explores the relationships between these policies, marital residence, education, and elderly support. Her findings show that both matri/patrilocality and the investment parents make in their children have declined since the implementation of the pension plans.

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  3. Grief and mourning in cross-cultural perspectiveRosenblatt, Paul C. - , 1976 - 12 Hypotheses

    This book investigates individual and group responses to death and the problems that death can create in a society. Several hypotheses regarding grief and mourning, as well as their variation with other societal variables, are supported with cross-cultural tests.

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  4. A cross-cultural study of reincarnation ideologies and their social correlatesMatlock, James Graham - , 1993 - 33 Hypotheses

    This dissertation discusses the divided theoretical approach to how reincarnation, animism, spirits, and general religious beliefs occur within societies cross-culturally. Matlock offers evidence to support Tyler, contradicting the generally accepted Durkheimian approach, arguing that the belief about souls and spirits may originate in dreams and other empirical experiences, in turn informing and shaping social organization. Durkheim argued the opposite, claiming that religious beliefs reflect social organization such as the clan and kinship. The author states 33 quantitative hypotheses to be tested using 30 of the first 60 sample societies available in the HRAF Probability Sample.

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  5. Evolutionary theory, kinship, and childbirth in cross-cultural perspectiveHuber, Brad R. - Cross-Cultural Research, 2007 - 4 Hypotheses

    Using an evolutionary perspective, this study tests hypotheses relating gender and kinship roles to the amount of direct and indirect care provided during and around childbirth. The roles of paternal certainty, residence rules and descent groups are also examined.

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  6. The role of the aged in primitive societySimmons, Leo W. - , 1945 - 15 Hypotheses

    Explores 109 traits relating primarily to physical habitat, economy, political and social organization, and religion, to see how they relate to the role and treatment of the aged. General patterns were sought. Numerous ethnographic examples are given.

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  7. Drivers of insect consumption across human populationsCruz y Celis Peniche, Patricio - Evolutionary Anthropology, 2022 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study seeks to shed light on the practice of entomophagy (insect consumption) across human population and seeks to explain the variability in its practice. The author explore potential ecological predictors for insect consumption (climate, subsistence practices, other available food resources, dietary needs) as well as cultural predictors (social transmission, cultural norms, evolution, and shift). Ultimately, the author concludes that entomophagy may be a useful medium through which to examine the interaction between social learning, subsistence strategies, and modernization.

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  8. A quantitative analysis of intensification in the ethnographic recordSandeford, David S. - Nature Human Behaviour, 2021 - 2 Hypotheses

    The author evaluates predictions from the standard model of intensification of food production and suggests it be rejected based on an analysis of 40 societies. The standard model proposes that food producers will increase their energy input until the maximum possible output is achieved, at which point output and labor productivity will fall and producers will invent or adopt new technologies. He then proposes a different model, which he terms the cultural niche construction model. The cultural niche construction model proposes that societies will minimize their energy input while maximizing their returns through continual technological adaptation and niche construction. After predictions from this second model are tested, the author suggests tentatively accepting the cultural niche construction model as a new framework to explain transitions to complex societies.

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  9. Population growth, society, and culture: an inventory of cross-culturally tested causal hypothesesSipes, Richard G. - , 1980 - 51 Hypotheses

    This book examines population growth rate and its correlates by testing 274 hypotheses (derived from multiple theories) with an 18-society sample. Forty-one of these hypotheses were significant at the .05 level, leading the author to accept these relationships as reflective of the real world. The 274 hypotheses are grouped into 51 broader hypotheses, and marked by (*) where relationships are significant as designated by the author or by significance p < 0.05.

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  10. Explaining divergence in the long-term effects of precolonial centralization on access to public infrastructure services in NigeriaArchibong, Belinda - World Development, 2019 - 8 Hypotheses

    This study investigates previous findings that indicate precolonial centralization was beneficial for development in Africa. Using new survey data from public primary schools, the author shows that the failure of leaders of centralized regions to comply with federal regimes was punished with underinvestment in public infrastructure services, hindering development and limiting access to these services in recent populations. The author proposes that the extent to which precolonial centralization was beneficial for development in Africa is mediated by compliance of the local governing bodies with federal regimes.

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