Found 863 Documents across 87 Pages (0.009 seconds)
  1. Warm climates and sonority classes: not simply more vowels and fewer consonantsMunroe, Robert L. - Cross-Cultural Research, 2009 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article adds nuanced findings to the previous generalization that high sonority of the vowel explains its more frequent use in warmer climates. The authors find that “speakers in warm-climate languages make more use of the so-called “sonorant” consonants, that is, consonants with some of the qualities of vowels” (123).

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  2. High CV score: regular rhythm or sonority?Ember, Carol R. - American Anthropologist, 2000 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article is a response to Munroe, Fought, and Fought's comments on a previous study of sonority and climate. Authors suggest that the three indices used by Munroe, Fought, and Fought to measure sonority are not the same contruct and present new results that indicate an association between climate, topography, and vowel index.

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  3. The sun and the moon in cross-cultural perspectiveMunroe, Robert L. - Cross-Cultural Research, 2015 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article compares the relative importance of the sun vs. the moon for a world-wide sample of societies. The contexts in which the sun and the moon are found important are also compared.

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  4. Climate and behavior: a biocultural studyRobbins, Michael C. - Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 1972 - 7 Hypotheses

    This study proposes ways in which the environment may affect behavioral and psychocultural processes. Results provide moderate support for a relationship between climate and emotional expressiveness.

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  5. Response to ember and ember's "climate, econiche, and sexuality: influences on sonority in language"Munroe, Robert L. - American Anthropologist, 2007 - 1 Hypotheses

    Munroe and Fought attempt to add new perspective to Ember and Ember's (2007) assertion that certain environmental features help to predict mean sonority levels in speech. This article discusses the other possible elements such as word length that might raise the level of communicative efficiency.

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  6. Rhythmicity or sonority: response to ember and ember's "cross-language predictors of consonant-vowel syllables"Munroe, Robert L. - American Anthropologist, 2000 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article presents a reanalysis of a previous study on language rhythm and consonant-vowel syllables by Ember and Ember (2000). Communicative efficiency, climate, baby-holding, literacy, and mean number of syllables per word were all considered as factors in consonant-vowel syllable use.

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  7. Climate and the consonant-vowel (CV) syllable: a replication within language familiesMunroe, Robert L. - Cross-Cultural Research, 1999 - 3 Hypotheses

    Using a sample of four language families, this paper replicates previous findings on the relationship between consonant-vowel syllable use and climate. An secondary finding on the relationship between consonant-vowel syllable use and writing system was also replicated.

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  8. Cross-cultural correlates of the consonant-vowel (cv) syllableMunroe, Robert L. - Cross-Cultural Research, 1996 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study examines whether language construction, specifically the number of consonant-vowel syllables, will be related to the environment and literacy of a society. Empirical analysis suggests that consonant-vowel syllables are more common in warmer climates and less common in written languages.

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  9. Environmental constraints on infant care practicesWhiting, John W.M. - Handbook of Cross-Cultural Human Development, 1981 - 2 Hypotheses

    This chapter examines infant carrying practices across cultures. The author suggests that infant carrying practices are affected by both climate and history. Findings indicate regional patterns in infant carrying practices and in the borrowing of infant carrying practices within regions. Results support the hypothesis.

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  10. Factors affecting human fertility in nonindustrial societies: a cross-cultural studyNag, Moni - Yale University Publications in Anthropology, 1962 - 13 Hypotheses

    Focusing on 61 preindustrial societies that have information on fertility, the author asks what factors may explain variation in fertility, what devices are used to control fertility, and whether differences in fertility appear to be in line with the societies' environments.

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