Found 514 Documents across 52 Pages (0.009 seconds)
  1. The role of pre-mastication in the evolution of complementary feeding strategies: a bio-cultural analysisZhang, Yuanyuan - , 2007 - 1 Hypotheses

    This thesis uses a cross-cultural sample to examine the relationship between anemia and infant feeding practices. Examples from the ethnography are presented. Findings are largely descriptive on practice, but are largely inconclusive with regard to anemia.

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  2. Allomaternal nursing in humansHewlett, Barry S. - Current Anthropology, 2014 - 6 Hypotheses

    Considerable variation has been observed in allomaternal nursing (breast-feeding by individuals other than mothers) behavior across contemporary foraging populations: while relatively common in some populations, it is rare or absent among others. Here the authors examine data on allomaternal nursing from 12 previous studies of foraging societies and utilize a worldwide sample of 104 cultures to assess global variation in allomaternal nursing.

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  3. Food and its vicissitudes: a cross-cultural study of sharing and nonsharingCohen, Yehudi A. - Social Structure and Personality, 1961 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article examines the relationship between early food gratification, emotional predispositions to share food with others, and community systems. Results suggest that gratification of food needs varies with community type, and young children who receive food whenever they cry or ask are more likely to share food in adulthood. In broader terms, the need to receive from others is gratified differently under different sociological conditions, and these differences influence individuals toward divergent socially patterned behaviors in adulthood.

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  4. A Cross-Cultural Nutrition Survey of 118 Societies, Representing the Major Cultural and Geographic Areas of the WorldWhiting, Marjorie Grant - , 1958 - 22 Hypotheses

    Dietary variation has been implicated in population-level heath outcomes such as adult height and infant health. Here the author investigates these relationships in a sample of 118 nonindustrial societies, providing a comparative and quantitative assessment of nutrition and health cross-culturally.

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  5. Human lactation, pair-bonds, and alloparents: a cross-cultural analysisQuinlan, Robert J. - Human Nature, 2008 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines the relationship between pairbonds and lactation, specifically the relationship between pairbond stability, alloparenting, and cross-cultural trends in breastfeeding. Findings show that both conjugal stability and availability of alloparental care are associated with age at weaning.

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  6. Childhood experience and adult personality--a cross-cultural study using the concept of ego strengthAllen, Martin G. - Journal of Social Psychology, 1967 - 6 Hypotheses

    This article examines the relationship between childhood experience and adult personality. This aspect of the adult personality is defined as ego strength. The emphasis of this study is mental health, maturity and the effectiveness of adult learning. Psychoanalytic theory predicts curvilinear relationships but most relationships are linear.

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  7. Why on earth?: Evaluating hypotheses about the physiological functions of human geophagyYoung, Sera L. - The Quarterly Review of Biology, 2011 - 5 Hypotheses

    The author tests various hypotheses regarding cross-cultural occurrence of geophagy, the eating of earth. Nearly 500 years of references to geophagy were compiled into the Database on Human Geophagy, which was then used to examine biological justifications for this little-understood behavior.

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  8. Relationships between subsistence and age at weaning in "preindustrial" societiesSellen, Daniel W. - Human Nature, 2001 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study tests the weaning food availability hypothesis, that both the introduction of foods other than breastmilk and the cessation of breastfeeding will vary by society's subsistence type. This hypothesis has implications for demography, as accelerated weaning can lead to increases in both mothers' fertility (due to decreased birth intervals) and infant mortality (due to the presence of pathogens in new foods).

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  9. Universal and variable leadership dimensions across human societiesGarfield, Zachary H. - Evolution and Human Behavior, 2020 - 6 Hypotheses

    This study seeks to better understand different forms of leadership across non-WEIRD (Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich, and Democratic) societies, and tests evolutionary theories regarding the qualities of leaders, their functions, and the costs and benefits they incur and provide as a part of their leadership. The authors assess the various aspects of leaders and leadership by coding 109 dimensions of leadership as represented in eHRAF World Cultures, using the Probability Sample Files, comprised on 60 cultures. By assessing the prevalence of each of these dimensions in the various cultures under consideration, the authors were able to ascertain some largely universal characteristics of leaders: that they 1) were judged intelligent and knowledgeable; 2) resolved conflicts; and 3) received material and social benefits. They also found that other dimensions varied by considerably group context (e.g., kin group leaders tended to be older), subsistence strategy (e.g., hunter-gatherer leaders tend to lack coercive authority), and gender (e.g., female leaders are more associated with family contexts). Further analyses showed that followers and leaders both benefited from leadership, and that shamans constitute a new brand of leader that both utilizes prestige and dominance in order to effectively rule.

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  10. Pubic Hair Removal Practices in Cross-Cultural PerspectiveCraig, Lyndsey K. - Cross-Cultural Research, 2018 - 3 Hypotheses

    Researcher's examine the presence of pubic hair removal (PHR) and retention in a cross-cultural setting, looking to see if such practices exist outside of the West, where it is well documented. Data from societies with PHR or retention from the eHRAF World Cultures sample were analyzed. Results indicate that PHR or retention exists cross-culturally without influence from the West. Commonly practiced for hygiene, women remove or retain pubic hair more often than men, with the main methods for removal being plucking.

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