Found 896 Documents across 90 Pages (0.057 seconds)
  1. Farming and Fighting: An Empirical Analysis of the Ecological-Evolutionary Theory of the Incidence of WarfareEff, E. Anthon - Structure and Dynamics, 2012 - 13 Hypotheses

    In this article, the authors seek to reevaluate Nolan's (2003) study on the primary determinants of war. They reanalyze his hypotheses with what they claim are more robust measures and methodology. They conclude that there is only a little evidence supporting Nolan's theories, that more productive echnology and higher population density predict war, and that overall ecological-evolutionary and sociopolitical explanations of war are equally supported by empirical data.

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  2. Military deterrence in history: a pilot cross-historical surveyNaroll, Raoul - , 1974 - 11 Hypotheses

    This book takes a cross-cultural, cross-historical approach to the study of military deterrence. Political, economic, and geographic correlates are considered, particularly military and diplomatic strategy. Several hypotheses are tested and some are supported.

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  3. The evolution of war: a cross-cultural studyOtterbein, Keith F. - , 1970 - 30 Hypotheses

    This book investigates the evolution of military organizations and their activities. Hypotheses frequently relate military organizations to political variables. Data suggested that more politically centralized societies have more sophisticated military organizations which are more likely to be successful in conflict (though military sophistication does not appear to deter attack).

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  4. Primitive warfare and Appendix IXWright, Quincy - A Study of War, 1942 - 7 Hypotheses

    This chapter is concerned with correlates of warlikeness among non-industrial societies. Findings indicate that warlikeness is associated with climate, mobility, subsistence, political integration, division of labor, culture contact.

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  5. Trade and warfare in cross-cultural perspectiveKorotayev, Andrey V. - Social Evolution & History, 2008 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article examines the relationship between warfare and trade and concludes that the relationship varies within different levels of political organization.

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  6. Military organization as a response to residence and size of population: a cross-cultural studyCarter, Jr., Harold - Behavior Science Research, 1977 - 7 Hypotheses

    This study tests an adaptational theory of military organization. Test of the relationship between population, residence type and military organization are presented; findings support the hypotheses.

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  7. An evolutionary agent-based model of pre-state warfare patterns: cross-cultural testsBurtsev, Mikhail S. - World Cultures, 2004 - 1 Hypotheses

    The authors construct a mathematical model from which they generate their main hypothesis that resource unpredictability should be associated with frequency of warfare. A cross-cultural test of this hypothesis was performed by Ember and Ember (1992). The authors critique these findings for state societies and test and alternate hypothesis for application to state societies.

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  8. The conditions favoring age-set organizationRitter, Madeline Lattman - Journal of Anthropological Research, 1980 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article reviews the theories on age-set systems and presents a cross-cultural test of Bernardi's theory regarding the development of age-sets as a response to a need for a system of integration in the context of frequent warfare. The findings do not support the hypothesis but rather point to the importance of changing group size and composition of local groups, as well as warfare, in predicting age-set systems.

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  9. Internal war: a cross-cultural studyOtterbein, Keith F. - American Anthropologist, 1968 - 9 Hypotheses

    This study examines how social structure, political organization, and intersocietal relations may affect the incidence of internal warfare (between culturally similar political communities). Results show that in uncentralized political systems, fraternal interest groups and unauthorized raiding parties may increase the incidence of internal war.

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  10. History and Ethnic Conflict: Does Precolonial Centralization Matter?Ray, Subhasish - International Studies Quarterly, 2019 - 1 Hypotheses

    Using a self selected sample of 33 ex British colonies and the Ethnic Power Relations database, the author sampled 170 ethnic groups from Africa, Asia, and the Middle East to test for association between precolonial state formation, colonial state building tactics, and modern ethnic conflicts. The author theorized that ethnic groups that were centrally governed before the colonial period were less likely to be recruited to colonial security forces, leaving them out of the picture during the formation of the independence movement and the formation of a post-colonial regime. This in turn is theorized to lead to greater contemporary armed conflict against the regime from which they were excluded.

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