Found 816 Documents across 82 Pages (0.008 seconds)
  1. Violence Against Women: A Cross-cultural Analysis for AfricaAlesina, Alberto - Economica, 2021 - 3 Hypotheses

    The authors of this study investigate both intimate partner violence (IPV) in Africa and tolerance towards it. Merging Demographic and Health Survey data with information from the Ethnographic Atlas, they take into account a wide range of ancestral characteristics that could influence domestic violence today, including precolonial economic roles and marriage traditions. Their findings indicate that societies in which men were dominant in subsistence and/or had androcentric marital practices have more IPV today, and more acceptance of it. They also find an interesting gender gap in acceptance of IPV, in which women are more likely than men to justify domestic violence.

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  2. Quality and equality in marriage: a cross-cultural viewHendrix, Lewellyn - Cross-Cultural Research, 1997 - 9 Hypotheses

    This article presents a review of the scholarly work relating to marital quality. Cross-cultural testing of various predictors of marital qualtiy are presented singlely as well as multiple regression analyses.

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  3. Male-female relationships in cross-cultural perspective: a study of sex and intimacyBroude, Gwen J. - Behavior Science Research, 1983 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study explores the extent to which heterosexual sex, love, and intimacy are interrelated and the degree to which the sexual revolution has had a positive or negative impact on male-female relationships. The author employs a correlation matrix to examine the interrelationships of several variables related to aloofness and intimacy in the sexual and non-sexual aspects of heterosexual relationships. Results suggest that the sexual revolution has had some positive effects on male-female relationships, but also that sexual behavior does not predict the degree to which marriages are intimate or aloof. Results also show little support for the hypothesis that marital aloofness is related to hypermasculinity.

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  4. The importance of paternal warmthVeneziano, Robert A. - Cross-Cultural Research, 2003 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article investigates paternal warmth, particularly its relationship with parental proximity (often used as its proxy) and maternal warmth. The author also investigates whether paternal warmth, paternal proximity, materal warmth, and socialization for aggression are good predictors of theft, homicide, and violence in offspring.

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  5. Beating of wives: a cross-cultural perspectiveCampbell, Jacquelyn C. - Victimology, 1985 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article presents a preliminary cross-cultural analysis of wifebeating. The author examines the relationships between wifebeating and various socio-economic variables and finds potential relationships between father absence, general acceptance of violence and wifebeating.

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  6. Social organization, spousal resources, and marital power: a cross-cultural studyWarner, Rebecca L. - Journal of Marriage and the Family, 1986 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study examines the effect of family structural complexity, residence and descent system, and female contribution to subsistence on women's power in marriage. Results suggest that wives have more power in marriage where there is nuclear family organization and matrilocality. The authors suggest that resource theory should broaden its conception of valued resources to include dimensions such as family organization patterns.

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  7. Physical punishment of children and wifebeating in cross-cultural perspectiveLevinson, David - Child Abuse and Neglect, 1981 - 1 Hypotheses

    The author tests Straus' model of wifebeating that suggests that socialization through violence (by encouraging aggression, corporal punishment and by observing violence) increases the likelihood of wifebeating. The relationship between socialization of children using violent techniques and wifebeating is tested using the Probability Sample Files.

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  8. Arranged Marriage Often Subverts Offspring Mate Choice: An HRAF-Based StudyAgey, Elizabeth - American Anthropologist, 2021 - 1 Hypotheses

    In this study, the authors explore the presence of disagreement between parents and their children over choice in spouse as an extension of theories regarding the evolution of mate choice. In non-human animal studies, free mate choice is generally associated with higher fitness. Thus mate preferences, in humans and non-human animals, may have evolved to improve fitness in comparison to random mating. Arranged marriages might likewise reduce biological fitness if parents choose a different spouse than their children would choose. Using ethnographic data from 119 societies, the authors assess the degree to which parents and offspring disagree on mate choice. In about 85% of the cases examined, parents disagreed with offspring choice. The authors call for explicit research on fitness outcomes when disagreement occurs.

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  9. The socio-cultural context of rape: a cross-cultural studySanday, Peggy Reeves - Journal of Social Issues, 1981 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article offers an analysis of the rape of women cross-culturally, positing that rape is present under certain cultural circumstances. The author tests for correlations between rape and aspects of sexual repression, group violence, childrearing, and ideologies of male dominance. There are significant associations between male sexual violence and other types of violence, as well as between rape and ideologies of male dominance.

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  10. Adolescence: an anthropological inquirySchlegel, Alice - , 1991 - 81 Hypotheses

    This book discusses the characteristics of adolescence cross-culturally and examines the differences in the adolescent experience for males and females. Several relationships are tested in order to gain an understanding of cross-cultural patterns in adolescence.

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