Found 923 Documents across 93 Pages (0.011 seconds)
  1. The transition from childhood to adolescence: cross-cultural studies of initiation ceremonies, legal systems, and incest taboosCohen, Yehudi A. - , 1964 - 4 Hypotheses

    The theoretical concern of this work is with different types of liability that societies emphasize in their legal systems and how that plays out in understanding the transition from childhood to adolescence as well as variation in incest taboos.

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  2. Avoidance, social affiliation, and the incest tabooSweetser, Dorrian Apple - Ethnology, 1966 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article examines parent-in-law avoidance in non-industrial societies. The author suggests that in-law avoidance is associated with characteristics of kinship structure, such as lineality, residence and family type. A psychological interpretation is also offered. Results support hypotheses relating to kinship structure.

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  3. Cultural dimensions: a factor analysis of textor's a cross-cultural summaryStewart, Robert A. C. - Behavior Science Notes, 1972 - 12 Hypotheses

    This article uses factor analysis to identify the key variables underlying the many cross-cultural associations reported by Textor (1967). Twelve factors are identified.

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  4. Adolescence: an anthropological inquirySchlegel, Alice - , 1991 - 81 Hypotheses

    This book discusses the characteristics of adolescence cross-culturally and examines the differences in the adolescent experience for males and females. Several relationships are tested in order to gain an understanding of cross-cultural patterns in adolescence.

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  5. Male dominance and female autonomy: domestic authority in matrilineal societiesSchlegel, Alice - , 1972 - 15 Hypotheses

    This book examines male and female power in various kinship configurations. Variables for male dominance and female autonomy are associated with various political and social variables, such as political complexity and co-wife jealousy. Several hypotheses are supported.

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  6. Early childhood precursors of adolescent initiation ceremoniesBarry III, Herbert - Ethos, 1980 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study presents a psychological theory for adolescent initiation ceremonies. Findings support the hypothesis that initiation is a mechanism for maintaining continuity between the stages of childhood and adulthood, when the body is physiologically in discontinuity.

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  7. Cross-sex patterns of kin behavior: a commentGoody, Jack - Behavior Science Research, 1974 - 4 Hypotheses

    This paper examines the behavior between close kin and affines of the opposite sex. The authors "point to certain differences between continental areas that are related to specific social factors, including the structure of descent groups and the nature of marriage arrangements."

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  8. Relationships among selected child-rearing variables in a cross-cultural sample of 110 societiesZern, David - Developmental Psychology, 1984 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article examines child-training through children's display of individualistic orientations (self-reliance, achievement, and general independence) and/or group orientations (responsibility, nurturance, and obedience). Five sub-categories measure whether each orientation is linked to a child's experience of general pressure or performance anxiety/conflict. Together, these orientations their sub-categories total 30 variables that were correlated; differences in gender were also examined. Results indicate that child-rearing pressure to act one way predicts pressure to act in other ways, and this pattern of interaction between variables did not vary by gender.

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  9. Household structure and socialization practicesMunroe, Ruth H. - Journal of Social Psychology, 1980 - 1 Hypotheses

    An earlier study (Minturn & Lambert 1964) found a nonsignificant association between multifamily households and social permisiveness. This article re-tests that association using Barry et al.'s ratings for child socialization practices, finding that having several families in one house tends to decrease socialization pressure on children.

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  10. Socialization values and parental control techniques: A cross-cultural analysis of child-rearingEllis, Godfrey J. - Journal of Comparative Family Studies, 1992 - 3 Hypotheses

    An existing body of research has, based on Kohn's (1977) theory of values of conformity vs. self-reliance in children of blue -collar vs. white-collar working families, suggested that socialization which emphasizes conformity is more likely to employ coercive rather than inductive methods. However, the researchers' tests for correlation of emphasis on conformity with coercive, inductive, and overall parental control indicate that parents in societies which emphasize conformity utilize both methods equally, and exert more control overall over their children than those in societies which emphasize self-reliance. The authors also test for predictors of conformity and present path models of direct and indirect effects.

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