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  1. Migration, external warfare, and matrilocal residenceDivale, William Tulio - Cross-Cultural Research, 1974 - 3 Hypotheses

    Several theories on the development of matrilocal residence are tested. The main argument put forth predicts that matrilocal residence will develop in response to a need to break up fraternal interest groups that encourage internal war and instead encourage a pattern of external war that is more beneficial in populated regions with additional group migration.

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  2. The Matrilocal Tribe: An Organization of Demic ExpansionJones, Doug - Human Nature, 2011 - 2 Hypotheses

    In this article, the author argues that matrilocality is a form of social organization that is conducive to expansion in tribal societies with smaller populations. Because this organization increases internal solidarity and success in external warfare, the theory suggests that it is best suited for expansion on cultural frontiers by groups with small populations. The author supports this theory with empirical tests on 33 societies and case studies of Bantu and Austronesian expansion.

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  3. Human securities, sustainability, and migration in the ancient U.S. Southwest and Mexican NorthwestIngram, Scott E. - Ecology and Society, 2021 - 1 Hypotheses

    Information from the archaeological record from 9 culture areas was used to explore the influence of human insecurities on the rate of depopulation in the U.S. Southwest and Mexican Northwest region during the 1300 to 1400s. The authors found that as the sum of human insecurities increased in culture areas, the speed of depopulation also increased. They hope to relate these findings to modern sustainability planning and to advocate with the UN Development Programme for increased human security.

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  4. The island biogeography of languagesGavin, Michael C. - Global Ecology and Biogeography, 2012 - 2 Hypotheses

    This paper examines the enormous variation in linguistic diversity among Pacific Islands by testing its relationship with various environmental variables put forth in several common theories of language richness. The researchers identify variables relating to land area and island isolation as accounting for about half of variation in linguistic diversity, suggesting that the other half is a result of complex social factors.

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  5. Spread of cattle led to the loss of matrilineal descent in Africa: a coevolutionary analysisHolden, Clare Janki - Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B: Biological Sciences, 2003 - 2 Hypotheses

    Through phylogenetic comparison, Holden and Mace explore the relationship between descent and cattle among a sample of 68 Bantu/Bantoid-speaking populations in Africa. The authors posit that when matrilineal cultures adopt cattle, they become patrilineal. Possible theories are offered to explain trends and variation in the data.

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  6. The biogeographic origins of novelty-seeking traitsGören, Erkan - Evolution and Human Behavior, 2016 - 2 Hypotheses

    The researcher looks for empirical evidence of natural selection as an explanation for worldwide variation in novelty-seeking behavior. Examining the relationship between variability in frequency of the DRD4 exon III 7-repeat allele variant (a variant theorized to stifle dopamine reception and thus encourage compensatory novelty-seeking behavior) and migratory distance from prehistoric humans' origin point in East Africa yields a positive correlation. After controlling for various biogeographic indicators, the researcher theorizes that presence of the DRD4 exon III 7-repeat variant provided an exploratory urge and evolutionary advantage to hunter-gatherers and pastoralists who migrated into unfamiliar environments.

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  7. An explanation for matrilocal residenceDivale, William Tulio - Being Female: Reproduction, Power, and Change, 1975 - 6 Hypotheses

    This study explores possible causes of matrilocal residence. Previous hypotheses are unsupported. Results show a significant relationship between matrilocality and recent migration.

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  8. Was the Wealth of Nations determined in 1000 BC?Comin, Diego - American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, 2010 - 1 Hypotheses

    The authors explore the relationship between differences in technology adoption across cultures in snapshots from 1000 BCE, 0 CE, 1500 CE, and 2002 CE. While acknowledging various flaws inherent in the ambitious scope of their dataset, a significant relationship is nonetheless revealed between technology adoption in 1500 CE and technology and income in 2002 CE after controlling for various geographic and demographic factors. The authors suggest that this persistence may occur because technology adoption is heavily dependent on stock of prior technology.

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  9. Hunter-gatherers and the origins of religionPeoples, Hervey C. - Human Nature, 2016 - 6 Hypotheses

    What is the evolutionary sequence of beliefs in hunter-gatherers? The authors attempt to answer this question by reconstructing the development of various traits in traditional societies using phylogenetic and linguistic source trees. Testing for correlated evolution between this reconstruction and population history as proxied by linguistic classification suggests the presence of animism at profound time depth, aligning with classical anthropological religious theory put forth by E.B. Tylor. Coevolutions between other religious concepts including shamanism, ancestor worship, active ancestor worship, high gods, active high gods, and belief in an afterlife are also examined.

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  10. The causes of matrilocal residence: a cross-ethnohistorical surveyDivale, William Tulio - , 1974 - 20 Hypotheses

    Author proposes and presents evidence in support of the theory that most societies practice virilocal or patrilocal residence (this is the "normal" pattern" and that matrilocal residence is adopted when societies migrate to an already populated area.

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