Found 574 Documents across 58 Pages (0.013 seconds)
  1. A cross-cultural study of female initiation ritesBrown, Judith K. - American Anthropologist, 1963 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study explores why initiation rites for girls are observed in some societies and absent in others. Further, the author seeks to understand cross-cultural variation in the rites.

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  2. Adolescent initiation ceremonies: a cross-cultural codeSchlegel, Alice - Ethnology, 1979 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article presents codes for adolescent initiation ceremonies in the standard cross-cultural sample. Commonly held assumptions about initiation ceremonies were not supported. Article focuses on differences between male and female ceremonies. Statistically significant correlations between the codes are indicated.

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  3. Female puberty rites: reconsideration and speculationKitahara, Michio - Adolescence, 1983 - 4 Hypotheses

    Brown's (1963) three hypotheses on female puberty rites were tested. After presenting an adjustment for data quality control, the author demonstrates that Brown's (1963) relationships became insignificant. Female physiology as symbolized by menstruation is suggested as a better predictor for female puberty rites.

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  4. A Cross-Cultural Summary: Male Initiation RitesTextor, Robert B. - , 1967 - 14 Hypotheses

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural male initiation rites findings pertaining to cultural, environmental, psychological, and social phenomena.

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  5. The absent father and cross-sex identityBurton, Roger V. - Studies in Adolescence, 1963 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study advances the status envy hypothesis of sex identification to explain customs such as male initiation ceremonies and the couvade. Theory of sex identification is discussed; resource withholding, exclusive mother-child sleeping, patrilocality, father absence, female status, and initiation are all considered. Hypotheses are supported with empirical tests.

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  6. Cultural dimensions: a factor analysis of textor's a cross-cultural summaryStewart, Robert A. C. - Behavior Science Notes, 1972 - 12 Hypotheses

    This article uses factor analysis to identify the key variables underlying the many cross-cultural associations reported by Textor (1967). Twelve factors are identified.

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  7. Initiation ceremonies: a cross-cultural study of status dramatizationYoung, Frank W. - , 1965 - 13 Hypotheses

    This book investigates a broad hypothesis linking social solidarity and initiation ceremonies. The author proposes that “the degree of solidarity of a given social system determines the degree to which status transitions within it will be dramatized” (1). A variety of operational hypotheses are supported for both male and female initiation ceremonies.

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  8. Pain, fear, and circumcision in boys' adolescent initiation ceremoniesSchlegel, Alice - Cross-Cultural Research, 2017 - 6 Hypotheses

    Schlegel and Barry explore the conditions under which adolescent boys' initiation ceremonies involve rituals that frighten or cause pain to the initiates. The authors look for cross-cultural differences and similarities in cultural features associated with harsh rituals, in particular, genital operations.

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  9. The Function of Male Initiation Ceremonies at PubertyWhiting, John W.M. - Readings in social psychology, 1958 - 1 Hypotheses

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  10. Explaining male initiation ceremonies: new cross-cultural tests and a catalytic modelEmber, Carol R. - Cross-Cultural Research, 2010 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article discusses two different explanations of male initiation ceremonies. Evidence is also presented that suggests that psychological conflict might strongly predict male initiation in the presence of the following catalysts: nonmatrilocal residence, nonstate political organization, and warfare.

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