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  1. Polygyny and inheritance of wealthHartung, John - Current Anthropology, 1982 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study tests the hypothesis that humans tend to transmit wealth to male heirs where polygyny is possible. The results support this hypothesis.

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  2. Sexual dimorphism in stature and women's work: a phylogenetic cross-cultural analysisHolden, Clare - American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 1999 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article presents a phylogenetic approach to studying sexual dimorphism of stature. Results show a significant association between sexual division of labor and sexual dimorphism of stature.

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  3. Cassava production and processing in a cross-cultural sample of african societiesRomanoff, Steven - Behavior Science Research, 1992 - 12 Hypotheses

    This exploratory study seeks to explain cassava production and processing in Africa by considering cultural, agronomic, and environmental data. After examining the descriptive results of the agricultural and social contexts of cassava use, the authors build upon Boserup's population density model (1965) to analyze their own hypothesized model of cassava's importance among the sampled societies.

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  4. Human rape: an evolutionary analysisThornhill, Randy - Ethnology and Sociobiology, 1983 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article presents tests of hypotheses derived from an evolutionary approach to the rape of women. A cross-cultural test of the relationship between polygyny and rape in non-industrial societies is presented. Results suggest that the degree of polygyny is positively associated with the severity of punishment for rape.

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  5. Cultural trait transmission and missing data as sources of bias in cross-cultural survey research: explanations of polygyny re-examinedDow, Malcolm M. - Cross-Cultural Research, 2009 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study retests the work by Ember, Ember and Low (2007) on male mortality and pathogen stress as predictors of nonsororal polygyny. The authors argue that the work of Ember, Ember, and Low is biased because it does not include a variable for cultural trait transmission. Restesting the original Ember, Ember and Low data, including a variable for cultural trait transmission, authors find that male mortality and pathogen stress loose their significance and cultural trait transmission is the only significant predictor of nonsororal polygyny.

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  6. Marriage systems and pathogen stress in human societiesLow, Bobbi S. - American Zoologist, 1990 - 5 Hypotheses

    This article examines the relationship between pathogen stress and polygyny. Results indicate that there is a positive association between the two that is not confounded by geographic region, latitude, population density, male-male competition, or presence of brideprice. In particular, pathogen stress precicts higher levels of non-sororal polygyny and capturing women for wives or concubines.

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  7. Toward monogamy: a cross-cultural study of correlates of type of marriageOsmond, Marie W. - Social Forces, 1965 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study presents a sociological theory of marriage type based on socioeconomic organization. Results suggest that intensive agriculture, more stratification, greater political integration, a fixed settlement pattern, a larger population, and greater labor specialization tended to be correlates of monogamy.

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  8. Evolutionary ecology of human pair-bonds: cross-cultural tests of alternative hypothesesQuinlan, Robert J. - Cross-Cultural Research, 2007 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study tests three hypotheses on the evolution of the human pair-bond: male-provisioning, male mating competition, and the defense of offspring from other males. Findings indicate that male provisioning and mating competition are factors in the development of the pair-bond. Additional findings indicate that alloparentling, polygyny, and equal contribution to subsistence by each sex contribute to the security of the pair-bond.

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  9. New cross-cultural perspectives on marriage transactionsHuber, Brad R. - Cross-Cultural Research, 2011 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article refines previous research on marriage transactions and offers descriptions of new types of marriage transactions. First, the authors examine the frequency and distribution of marriage transactions. Second,the authors use a bio-cultural approach to examine how differences in male and female reproductive strategies and the kin selection theory are associated with marriage transactions.

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  10. Archaeology of slavery from cross-cultural perspectiveHrnčíř, Václav - Cross-Cultural Research, 2017 - 8 Hypotheses

    The authors examine correlations between slavery and variables that can potentially be detected archaeologically. The authors do not test specific hypotheses, but aim to explore the variables in a broader sense. As such, the authors use a grounded theory approach to data analysis in order to examine trends that emerge from the data itself.

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