Found 636 Documents across 64 Pages (0.011 seconds)
  1. War, sports, and aggression: an empirical test of two rival theoriesSipes, Richard G. - American Anthropologist, 1973 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study empirically tests two models of war, sports, and aggression: the drive discharge model which predicts sports and war will be inversely associated, and the culture pattern model which predicts sports and war will be directly associated. A direct association is supported. Relevant theory is discussed.

    Related DocumentsCite
  2. War Games: Intergroup Coalitional Play Fighting as a Means of Comparative Coalition Formability AssessmentScalise Sugiyama, Michelle - Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences, 2021 - 6 Hypotheses

    The authors explore coalitional play fighting (in which teams of at least two play against each other to achieve a goal) across hunter-gatherer societies, with the theory that play of this type may be a mechanism for assessing strength and utility for future defense or warfare. When played against other communities, they propose coalitional play fighting can also serve to gauge strength of potential allies or formidability of potential enemies. In order to test their theories, they predict that, despite the large energy cost and risk of sports associated with coalitional play fighting, these types of games will be widespread in hunter-gatherer societies. In addition, they predict that of those exhibiting coalitional play fighting, many will play against other communities. In support of their hypotheses, they find that 54% of hunter-gatherer societies examined exhibit coalitional play fighting, of which 81% play against other communities.

    Related DocumentsCite
  3. Economic Systems of Foraging, Agricultural, and Industrial SocietiesFrederic L. Pryor - , 2005 - 26 Hypotheses

    The second and third parts of this book classify the economic systems of foraging and agricultural societies in the SCCS based on correlations between their institutions of property an distribution. These economic types are then examined for relationships with other social, political, demographic, and environmental factors in order to draw tentative conclusions regarding the origins of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. The fourth part of the book uses cross-national data to examine similar associations in industrial/service economies, and is not included here.

    Related DocumentsCite
  4. Sex differences in sports across 50 societiesDeaner, Robert. O - Cross-Cultural Research, 2013 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article examines sex differences in sports and games of strategy and chance. Results indicated large differences in participation by gender, especially for combat and hunting sports and in patriarchal societies. The possible cross-cultural universality of this trend is discussed.

    Related DocumentsCite
  5. Economic systems of foragersPryor, Frederic L. - Cross-Cultural Research, 2003 - 1 Hypotheses

    This paper investigates five different economic types of foragers: classic, transitional system, politically oriented, economically oriented, and intangibles-oriented. The author asserts that these economic types “are not mere epiphenomena of the oft-discussed social structural or political forces but, rather, are special characteristics that must be independently taken into account” (418). A myriad of environmental, subsistence, political, and social variables are examined: some differed significantly across the five economic types of foragers, but others such as famine threat, conflict, locational fixity, marital form, and postmarital residence did not differ between types.

    Related DocumentsCite
  6. Cultural determinants of achievement, aggression, and psychological distressGorney, Roderic - Archives of General Psychiatry, 1980 - 5 Hypotheses

    This study examines the interrelationships between achievement, aggression, psychological distress, competition and interpersonal behavior. Authors suggest that levels of achievement, aggression, and psychological distress are partly determined by corresponding levels of of competition and interpersonal intensity. Hypotheses are supported.

    Related DocumentsCite
  7. Violence in the ethnographic record: results of cross-cultural research on war and aggressionEmber, Carol R. - Troubled Times: Violence and Warfare in the Past, 1997 - 7 Hypotheses

    This paper reviews the results of the author's cross-cultural studies of war and aggression and their implications for prehistory.

    Related DocumentsCite
  8. An evolutionary agent-based model of pre-state warfare patterns: cross-cultural testsBurtsev, Mikhail S. - World Cultures, 2004 - 1 Hypotheses

    The authors construct a mathematical model from which they generate their main hypothesis that resource unpredictability should be associated with frequency of warfare. A cross-cultural test of this hypothesis was performed by Ember and Ember (1992). The authors critique these findings for state societies and test and alternate hypothesis for application to state societies.

    Related DocumentsCite
  9. Trade and warfare in cross-cultural perspectiveKorotayev, Andrey V. - Social Evolution & History, 2008 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article examines the relationship between warfare and trade and concludes that the relationship varies within different levels of political organization.

    Related DocumentsCite
  10. Resource Unpredictability, mistrust, and war: a cross-cultural studyEmber, Carol R. - The Journal of Conflict Resolution, 1992 - 6 Hypotheses

    The article tests theories that may explain why warfare frequency varies from society to society. The focus is on ecological problems, particularly different kinds of resource scarcity, but social and psychological theories are also tested with both bivariate and multivariate analyses. Because unpredictable disasters are such a strong predictor in nonstate societies, the authors theorize that war may mostly be caused by a fear of nature.

    Related DocumentsCite