Found 892 Documents across 90 Pages (0.008 seconds)
  1. Modernization as changes in cultural complexity: new cross-cultural measurementsDivale, William Tulio - Cross-Cultural Research, 2001 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article considers the consequences of modernization. Factor analysis is used to identify four stages of modernization: 1) changes in education, government, and trade; 2) changes in health, technology, and transportation; 3) changes in family, religion, and toilet; and 4) changes in behavior. The authors then consider five trends they expect to be associated with modernization and test whether they develop over the course of the four stages. Results indicate that these 5 trends—increased cultural complexity, female status, pacification, suicide, and social stress—are associated with only the first and fourth stages.

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  2. Data quality and modes of marriage: some holocultural evidence of systematic errorsSchaefer, James Michael - Behavior Science Research, 1976 - 2 Hypotheses

    Authors explore the problem of data quality control, systematic error and spurious correlations possibly caused by systematic errors in global cross-cultural studies. They offer a solution (the use of control variables investigating potential sources of systematic error) and apply the technique to a cross-cultural study of the substantive correlates of societal organization and modes of marriage.

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  3. Tracking Cross-Cultural Gender Bias in ReputationsPost, Emily R. - Cross-Cultural Research, 2020 - 6 Hypotheses

    In this article, the authors examine the effects of social structure, specifically descent and residence, on areas of female reputation. Additionally, they examine the effect of the author's gender on the instances of female reputation included in ethnographic texts.

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  4. Systemic population control in the Middle and Upper Paleolithic: inferences based on contemporary hunter-gatherersDivale, William Tulio - World Archaeology, 1972 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article examines cultural forms of population control. Results suggest that female infanticide and warfare are interrelated and effective forms of population control.

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  5. An explanation for matrilocal residenceDivale, William Tulio - Being Female: Reproduction, Power, and Change, 1975 - 6 Hypotheses

    This study explores possible causes of matrilocal residence. Previous hypotheses are unsupported. Results show a significant relationship between matrilocality and recent migration.

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  6. The causes of matrilocal residence: a cross-ethnohistorical surveyDivale, William Tulio - , 1974 - 20 Hypotheses

    Author proposes and presents evidence in support of the theory that most societies practice virilocal or patrilocal residence (this is the "normal" pattern" and that matrilocal residence is adopted when societies migrate to an already populated area.

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  7. Hunting and the development of sign language: a cross-cultural testDivale, William Tulio - Journal of Anthropological Research, 1977 - 2 Hypotheses

    The association between hunting and sign language is examined. It is hypothesized that sign language develops as a form of nonverbal communication to aid hunters in the coordinated stalking of game. Ethnographic evidence supports this hypothesis. A second hypothesis is also tested concerning the relationship between population size and non-verbal communication, however sampling procedures provided an inadequate test of this hypothesis.

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  8. Migration, external warfare, and matrilocal residenceDivale, William Tulio - Cross-Cultural Research, 1974 - 3 Hypotheses

    Several theories on the development of matrilocal residence are tested. The main argument put forth predicts that matrilocal residence will develop in response to a need to break up fraternal interest groups that encourage internal war and instead encourage a pattern of external war that is more beneficial in populated regions with additional group migration.

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  9. Population, warfare, and the male supremacist complexDivale, William Tulio - American Anthropologist, 1976 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study focuses on the factors associated with the development and persistence of an ideology of male supremacy. Authors identify several realms of culture that show a clear male preference and suggest that warfare is the most significant cause of the male supremacy complex in preindustrial societies. Authors hypothesize that warfare will be positively related to female infanticide. Results support this hypothesis. Another hypothesis relating diet to warfare and infanticide is provided, but not tested.

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  10. Climatic instability, food storage, and the development of numerical counting: a cross-cultural studyDivale, William Tulio - Cross-Cultural Research, 1999 - 4 Hypotheses

    A model for the development of counting systems is tested. The hypothesis presented predicts that unpredictable climate conditions result in inconsistent food supply which leads to the need for food storage and, thus, a system to account for the stored food. Results strongly support this hypothesis.

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