Found 924 Documents across 93 Pages (0.008 seconds)
  1. Effects of residential mobility on the ratio of average house floor area to average household size: implications for demographic reconstructions in archaeologyPorcic, Marko - Cross-Cultural Research, 2012 - 1 Hypotheses

    Examines whether nomadism affects the ratio of average house floor area to average household size.

    Related DocumentsCite
  2. Mobility, housing, and environment: a comparative studyBinford, Lewis R. - Journal of Anthropological Research, 1990 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article examines housing, mobility, and subsistence among hunter-gatherers. Several statistical associations are supported. The author uses findings to evaluate the relative complexity of societies from the archaeological record.

    Related DocumentsCite
  3. Identifying post-marital residence patterns in prehistory: A phylogenetic comparative analysis of dwelling sizeHrnčíř, Václav - PLOS ONE, 2020 - 5 Hypotheses

    This study examines the association between post-marital residence patterns and dwelling size in pre-industrial societies using comparative methods and a global sample of 86 societies. The results suggest that matrilocality is associated with larger dwellings (over 65 square meters) in agricultural societies, while patrilocality is associated with smaller dwellings. The study also finds that sedentism is the single best predictor of house size. The study concludes that post-marital residence and house size evolve in a correlated fashion, which can help make reliable inferences about the social organization of prehistoric societies from archaeological records.

    Related DocumentsCite
  4. Circular or rectangular ground plans: Some costs and benefitsArwen L. Feather - Nebraska Anthropologist, 1996 - 5 Hypotheses

    In the present study, Feather explores the relationship between floor plan shape and settlement permanence in order to theorize how mobility strategy influences floor plan choice. Feather incorporates the theoretical framework of previous studies by examining how floor plans and building materials vary across mobility and residential strategies, as well as social and political concerns.

    Related DocumentsCite
  5. Floor area and settlement populationNaroll, Raoul - American Antiquity, 1962 - 1 Hypotheses

    This paper discusses the relationship between floor area and settlement population.

    Related DocumentsCite
  6. Inferences from the shape of dwellingsWhiting, John W.M. - Settlement Archaeology, 1968 - 5 Hypotheses

    This study examines several correlates of the shape of floor plans of dwellings. Authors find that "whether a culture is settled or nomadic, the form of its family and the presence or absence of status distinctions are related to its house type, and the house types can in turn be inferred from the floor plan." Curvilinear houses are associated with polygyny and nomadism and rectilinear houses are associated with sedentarism, extended families, and status distinctions.

    Related DocumentsCite
  7. Population estimation from floor area: a restudy of "naroll's constant"Brown, Barton McCaul - Cross-Cultural Research, 1987 - 4 Hypotheses

    A restudy of Naroll's (1962) measure of dwelling floor area using theory that it is predicted by the basic needs for protection from climate and crowding. This theory is not supported by the findings but Brown posits a new average for estimating floor area in dwellings based on his sample.

    Related DocumentsCite
  8. Technological organization and settlement mobility: an ethnographic examinationShott, Michael - Journal of Anthropological Research, 1986 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study tests the relationship between mobility and technology among foragers, with the intent of applying findings to the archaeological record. In data analysis, mobility frequency is differentiated from mobility magnitude, and technological diversity is differentiated from technological complexity. Results suggest that mobility frequency is negatively associated with technological diversity while mobility magnitude is negatively associated with technological complexity.

    Related DocumentsCite
  9. Data quality and modes of marriage: some holocultural evidence of systematic errorsSchaefer, James Michael - Behavior Science Research, 1976 - 2 Hypotheses

    Authors explore the problem of data quality control, systematic error and spurious correlations possibly caused by systematic errors in global cross-cultural studies. They offer a solution (the use of control variables investigating potential sources of systematic error) and apply the technique to a cross-cultural study of the substantive correlates of societal organization and modes of marriage.

    Related DocumentsCite
  10. An archaeological correlate of warPeregrine, Peter N. - North American Archaeologist, 1993 - 1 Hypotheses

    Using the ethnographic record, this study develops and tests the idea that community permeability may be used as an archaeological predictor of warfare. With the exception of pastoral societies, community permeability predicts warfare.

    Related DocumentsCite