Found 424 Documents across 43 Pages (0.011 seconds)
  1. Material Culture and CognitionRobbins, Michael C. - American Anthropologist, 1966 - 1 Hypotheses

    This paper tests for a correlation between primary house shapes and preferences for curved or straight lines in art.

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  2. Circular or rectangular ground plans: Some costs and benefitsArwen L. Feather - Nebraska Anthropologist, 1996 - 5 Hypotheses

    In the present study, Feather explores the relationship between floor plan shape and settlement permanence in order to theorize how mobility strategy influences floor plan choice. Feather incorporates the theoretical framework of previous studies by examining how floor plans and building materials vary across mobility and residential strategies, as well as social and political concerns.

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  3. Effects of residential mobility on the ratio of average house floor area to average household size: implications for demographic reconstructions in archaeologyPorcic, Marko - Cross-Cultural Research, 2012 - 1 Hypotheses

    Examines whether nomadism affects the ratio of average house floor area to average household size.

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  4. Mobility, housing, and environment: a comparative studyBinford, Lewis R. - Journal of Anthropological Research, 1990 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article examines housing, mobility, and subsistence among hunter-gatherers. Several statistical associations are supported. The author uses findings to evaluate the relative complexity of societies from the archaeological record.

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  5. Architecture as a material correlate of mobility strategies: some implications for archeological interpretationDiehl, Michael W. - Behavior Science Research, 1992 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article investigates a possible association between mobility strategy and dwelling construction. The author tests a broad hypothesis that planned duration of use for a structure is positively associated with the investment costs in building a dwelling. Some operational hypotheses are supported; others are not.

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  6. Cultural correlates of ceramic stylesPeregrine, Peter N. - Cross-Cultural Research, 2007 - 5 Hypotheses

    This study replicates John L. Fischer's (1961) cross-cultural analysis to demonstrate the correlation between art styles and social hierarchy and postmarital residence. The author suggests that archaeological ceramics might be used to predict social characteristics of prehistoric societies.

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  7. Art styles as cultural cognitive mapsFischer, J. L. - American Anthropologist, 1961 - 7 Hypotheses

    This paper tests theory suggesting that art is a form of expressive cultures which ultimately is shaped by the social conditions under which people in a society live. Focuses on social hierarchy and its relationship to art styles.

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  8. Male security and art style in traditional societiesGray, J. Patrick - The Journal of Social Psychology, 1981 - 6 Hypotheses

    This paper suggests that Fischer's (1961) "male security" variable is not adequate. Cross-cultural analyses suggest that male security in the realm of father-son interaction may be more important than male security in the realm of heterosexual interaction in explaining the line shape preference of a society.

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  9. An archaeological indicator of matrilocal versus patrilocal residenceEmber, Melvin - American Antiquity, 1973 - 1 Hypotheses

    The study suggests an archaeological indicator of matrilocal versus patrilocal residence. The cross-cultural samples suggest that matrilocal versus patrilocal residence can be simply and accurately predicted from the living floor area of the average house in the society.

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  10. Onstage and offstage sex: exploring a hypothesisMaxwell, Robert J. - Cornell Journal of Social Relations, 1967 - 4 Hypotheses

    The relationship between restrictions on premarital sex and the privacy of sexual practices is examined, using the degree of impenetrability of house materials as both a proxy and assumed cause for "offstage" or private sex. The author theorizes that permissive premarital sex norms are a response to open dwelling types which are themselves an adaptation to warm temperatures.

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