Found 1050 Documents across 105 Pages (0.01 seconds)
  1. Was the Duchess of Windsor right?: A cross-cultural review of the socioecology of ideals of female body shapeAnderson, Judith L. - Ethology and Sociobiology, 1992 - 7 Hypotheses

    Cultures vary widely in regards to beauty standards for female body fat: while industrialized nations typically prefer thinness in women, ethnographic reports indicate that plumpness is valued in many small-scale societies. Here the authors evaluate several hypotheses that relate variation in female body fat preference to variation in socioecology such as food storage, climate, male social dominance, valuation and restriction of women's work, and female stress during adolescence.

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  2. Skin color preference, sexual dimorphism and sexual selection: a case of gene culture co-evolution?van den Berghe, Pierre L. - Ethnic and Racial Studies, 1986 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study focuses on cultural preferences for skin pigmentation. Findings indicate a general preference for lighter pigmentation in women. Cultural and biological theories are offered, and the authors suggest the skin-pigmentation preference is an instance of gene-culture coevolution. Areas for further research to explain the relationship of this finding with other features of society are suggested.

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  3. Female status predicts female mate preferences across nonindustrial societiesMoore, Fhionna R. - Cross-Cultural Research, 2007 - 1 Hypotheses

    The effect of female status on women's mate preference in a sample of nonindustrial societies is examined.

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  4. Communication in the practice of love magicRosenblatt, Paul C. - Social Forces, 1971 - 1 Hypotheses

    This paper investigates love magic, proposing that it is a form of indirect communication in the development of male-female bonds. Findings support the hypothesis.

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  5. Sexual equality and romantic love: a reanalysis of rosenblatt's study on the function of romantic lovede Munck, Victor C. - Cross-Cultural Research, 1999 - 6 Hypotheses

    Based on work by Rosenblatt (1966), this article tests a hypothesis relating sexual freedom to romantic love. Findings suggest a relationship between premarital and extramarital sexual permissiveness equality for women and men and romantic love.

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  6. Cross-cultural factors associated with sexual foreplayGray, J. Patrick - The Journal of Social Psychology, 1980 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article examines reasons for the variation in sexual foreplay practices cross-culturally. Results suggest that exclusive mother-child sleeping arrangements is significantly associated with the presence of foreplay.

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  7. A Cross-Cultural Summary: Male Initiation RitesTextor, Robert B. - , 1967 - 14 Hypotheses

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural male initiation rites findings pertaining to cultural, environmental, psychological, and social phenomena.

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  8. Romantic Love and Family Organization: A Case for Romantic Love as a Biosocial Universalde Munck, Victor C. - Evolutionary Psychology, 2016 - 2 Hypotheses

    Previous cross-cultural studies of romantic love have, in the authors' view, been plagued by vague definitions of the concept and a conflation of cultural, bio-psychological, and social factors. Thus, the authors distinguish between the social aspect of romantic love (which they argue is a universal human predisposition) and the variable cultural valuation of romance. In a large cross-cultural sample, the authors test the hypotheses that gender equality and family organization are important predictors of the cultural valuation of romantic love.

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  9. Sex differences in mate choice criteria are reflected in folktales from around the world and in historical european literatureGottschall, Jonathan - Evolution and Human Behavior, 2004 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article expands on Buss's (1989) study of the differences in male and female mate preferences in Western folktale characters by adding non-Western data. The new results show support for Buss's original findings.

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  10. Parental choice: what parents want in a son-in-law and a daughter-in-law across 67 pre-industrial societiesApostolou, Menelaos - British Journal of Psychology, 2010 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article examines differences in parental preference of potential in-laws across cultures. Results suggest that parents look for traits that will benefit themselves and their kin and that gender and subsistence type affects the traits that parents deem most important.

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