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  1. Comment on gaulin and schlegel (1980)Wolfe, Linda D. - Ethology and Sociobiology, 1981 - 1 Hypotheses

    This comment suggests methodological flaws in Gaulin and Schlegel’s (1980) article on male parental certainty and investment practices. The authors take issue with multiple coding decisions and suggest that the findings from the 1980 study ought to be rejected; data does not support a positive association between male parental certainty and investment practices.

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  2. Sexual dimorphism in the human post-reproductive life-span: possible causesGaulin, Steven J.C. - Journal of Human Evolution, 1980 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study tests possible explanations for sexual dimorphism in human post-reproductive life-spans. The author focuses on explanations involving male paternal investment and finds that men in agricultural societies are more likely to invest in their offspring than men in hunter-gatherer societies.

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  3. Paternity Uncertainty and Parent–Offspring Conflict Explain Restrictions on Female Premarital Sex across SocietiesŠaffa, Gabriel - Human Nature, 2022 - 11 Hypotheses

    This study tests competing theories about whether it is men, women, or parents who benefit most from restricting female premarital sex (FPS) in a global sample of 128 non-industrial societies. The study found support for the idea that multiple parties benefit from restrictions on FPS -- specifically FPS is more restricted in societies intolerant of extramarital sex and where men transfer property to their children (male control), as well as where marriages are arranged by parents (parental control). They also found that major predictors of FPS appear to be paternity uncertainty and parent-offspring conflict. Furthermore, the study found that multiple factors such as social roles, rather than stereotyped sex roles, are a more useful approach in understanding FPS restrictions and these restrictions.

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  4. A cross-cultural investigation into the sexual dimorphism of statureWolfe, Linda D. - Sexual Dimorphism in Homo sapiens: A Question of Size, 1982 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article examines height and sexual dimorphism of stature from a sociobiological perspective. Diet, child rearing, and marriage practices are tested as possible factors contributing to height sexual dimorphism of stature. Results provide some support for a nutritional hypotheses, but sexual selection and parental investment are not statistically significant.

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  5. A Cross-Cultural Summary: Premarital Sexual RelationsTextor, Robert B. - A Cross-Cultural Summary, 1967 - 11 Hypotheses

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural findings on premarital sexual relations pertaining to cultural, environmental, psychological, and social phenomena.

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  6. Subsistence practices and human sexual dimorphism of statureWolfe, Linda D. - Journal of Human Evolution, 1982 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study tests the validity of two previous diachronic studies examining the relationship between subsistence strategy and sexual dimorphism of stature with synchronic data. The authors find that neither hypothesis is valid.

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  7. Paternal confidence and paternal investment: a cross cultural test of a sociobiological hypothesisGaulin, Steven J.C. - Ethnology and Sociobiology, 1980 - 2 Hypotheses

    Using paternal investment theory, the authors examine the relationship between paternal confidence and paternal investment in humans.

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  8. A note on brother inheritanceGray, J. Patrick - Ethnology and Sociobiology, 1982 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article presents a reanalysis of the theory put forth by Hartung (1981) regarding the relationship between inheritance and paternity confidence. The authors take issue with the original sample used and retest the hypothesis.

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  9. Female of the speciesMartin, M. Kay - , 1975 - 12 Hypotheses

    This book discusses the role of women cross-culturally. The authors use a cross-cultural sample to examine the differences between men and women in contribution to subsistence as well as the social juxtaposition of the sexes in foraging, horticultural, agricultural, pastoral, and industrial societies.

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  10. A Cross-Cultural Summary: Status of WomenTextor, Robert B. - , 1967 - 10 Hypotheses

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural findings on the status of women in relation to cultural, environmental, psychological, and social phenomena.

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