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  1. Social asset or social burden: treatment of the aged in non-industrial societiesGlascock, Anthony P. - Dimensions: Aging, Culture, and Health, 1981 - 7 Hypotheses

    This article uses cross-cultural methodology to examine the classification and treatment of the aged. Results suggest that the combination of supportive/unsupportive treatment is associated with the intact/decrepit age grouping.

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  2. A holocultural analysis of old ageGlascock, Anthony P. - Comparative Social Research, 1980 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study provides a cross-cultural examination of the definitions of old age. Further research on these definitions and their implications is suggested.

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  3. The myth of the golden isle: old age in pre-industrial societiesGlascock, Anthony P. - Selected Papers Volume of the 8th International Congress of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 1987 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study discusses the distribution of the treatment of the aged across a sample of pre-industrial societies. Data illustrate that the elderly were treated in a non-supportive or death-hastening manner in the majority of societies, dispelling the notion that a golden age/isle existed in pre-industrial societies in which the elderly were revered and supported. Results also suggest a relationship between age and treatment of the elderly and climate, social, and subsistence variables and the treatment of the aged.

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  4. They love me, they love me not: a worldwide study of the effects of parental acceptance and rejection.Rohner, Ronald P. - , 1975 - 18 Hypotheses

    The purpose of this book is to introduce a conceptual and methodological perspective called the "universalist approach," and to use this approach in exploring the pancultural antecedents and affects of parental acceptance-rejection of children,

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  5. Same-sex competition and sexual conflict expressed through witchcraft accusationsPeacey, Sarah - Scientific Reports, 2022 - 11 Hypotheses

    In this study, the authors analyze relationships between witchcraft accusations and the gender of the accused. They find that men are most often accused of witchcraft in their sample of 54 Bantu or Bantoid societies, and are particularly more likely to be accused of witchcraft by unrelated or blood-related individuals or in disputes over wealth or prestige. On the other hand, women are more likely to be accused of witchcraft in affinal relationships, particularly husbands and co-wives, and in situations related to fertility or relationships. Elderly women were also more likely to be accused of witchcraft than elderly men. The authors also examined outcomes of witchcraft accusations, finding that 81% of cases resulted in a negative outcome for the accused. They suggest that competition underlies accusations of witchcraft.

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  6. Why women's status changes in the middle ages: the turns of the social ferris wheelBart, Pauline B. - Sociological Symposium, 1969 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article focuses on the cross-cultural data comparing the relationship between changes in status and availability of important roles, with an emphasis on women. Cultural and structural aspects of society are examined to discover their relationship to the position of women after their child-bearing years.

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  7. The fear of death in primitive societiesLester, David - Science Research, 1975 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study tests for potential correlates of the fear of death in non-literate societies. Significant associations were found between the use of love-oriented techniques for punishment and a fear of death and a high need to achieve and a fear of death.

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  8. A cross-cultural investigation of behavioral changes at menopauseGriffen, Joyce - The Social Science Journal, 1977 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article presents an attempt to cross-culturally test of the hypothesis that rituals and/or behavioral changes will be associated with menopause. Due to a lack of sufficient data, statistical analyses were not performed but an examination of the ethnographic literature on the topic is presented.

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  9. Infant and child death in the human environment of evolutionary adaptationVolk, Anthony A. - Evolution and Human Behavior, 2013 - 3 Hypotheses

    High infant and child mortality rates are suggested to be one of the most enduring and important features of ancestral human environments, referred to as the Environment of Evolutionary Adaptedness (EEA). These rates contrast with the very low rates of infant and child mortality among many industrialized nations since the 19th and 20th centuries. The authors compare data from recent hunter-gatherer and agricultural societies, historical records, and non-human primates in attempt to quantitatively describe infant and child mortality rates during the EEA.

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  10. Senior esteem as a factor of socioeconomic complexitySheehan, Tom - The Gerontologist, 1976 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article investigates the treatment and position of elderly persons cross-culturally, proposing an association with society type. Analysis suggests that semisedentary or seminomadic peoples treat seniors with lower esteem while nucleated peasant communities treat seniors with more esteem. Esteem is defined as "the intersection of decision-making role or resource control and quality of received behavior" (433).

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