Found 1010 Documents across 101 Pages (0.04 seconds)
  1. Cultural determinants of jealousyHupka, Ralph B. - Alternative Lifestyles, 1981 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study explores the relationship between property ownership, pair bonding, and sex as predictors of romantic jealousy. The results of an unpublished cross-cultural study are presented in support of the theory.

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  2. A Cross-Cultural Summary: Premarital Sexual RelationsTextor, Robert B. - A Cross-Cultural Summary, 1967 - 11 Hypotheses

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural findings on premarital sexual relations pertaining to cultural, environmental, psychological, and social phenomena.

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  3. A Cross-Cultural Summary: Extramarital SexTextor, Robert B. - , 1967 - 15 Hypotheses

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural findings on extramarital sexual relations pertaining to cultural, environmental, psychological, and social phenomena.

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  4. Patterns of paternal investment predict cross-cultural variation in jealous responseScelza, B. A. - Nature Human Behavior, 2019 - 6 Hypotheses

    In an effort to better understand variation in jealous response cross-culturally, the researchers of this study surveyed 11 different populations, eight of which were small-scale societies on five different continents (Mayangna, Shuar, Tsimane, Himba, Hadza, Karo Batak, Mosuo, and Yasawa) and three of which were in urban settings (Los Angeles, CA, "urban India" (online), and Okinawa, Japan). Looking at the differences between sexual and emotional infidelity, researchers found that greater paternal investment and lower frequency of extramarital sex are associated with more severe jealous response.

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  5. Cross-cultural evaluation of predicted associations between race and behaviorPeregrine, Peter N. - Evolution and Human Behavior, 2003 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article tests Rushton's hypothesis that there is a relationship between "race" (Negroid, Caucasoid, and Mongoloid) and various aspects of behavior. Results do not support this hypothesis.

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  6. Extra-marital affairs: a reconsideration of the meaning and universality of the "double standard"Jankowiak, William - World Cultures, 2002 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study examines the variation in responses to sexual infidelity and the effect of social complexity and descent on responses to infidelity. Results suggest significant relationships between social complexity, descent, and responses to infidelity

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  7. Extramarital sex norms in cross-cultural perspectiveBroude, Gwen J. - Cross-Cultural Research, 1980 - 6 Hypotheses

    This study examines the double standard regarding extramarital norms for men and women in relation to other sociocultural factors. Results suggest that a double standard is significantly related to post-partum sex taboos, hypermasculinity, and father absence.

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  8. Adolescence: an anthropological inquirySchlegel, Alice - , 1991 - 81 Hypotheses

    This book discusses the characteristics of adolescence cross-culturally and examines the differences in the adolescent experience for males and females. Several relationships are tested in order to gain an understanding of cross-cultural patterns in adolescence.

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  9. Managing infidelity: a cross-cultural perspectiveJankowiak, William - Ethnology, 2002 - 5 Hypotheses

    This study focuses on spousal responses to extramarital affairs cross-culturally. Results suggest that men and women are equally concerned with the sexual activities of their spouses, however, tactics used in response to infidelity vary by gender. Results also show a relationship between social complexity and responses to infidelity.

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  10. The cultural consequences of female contribution to subsistenceSchlegel, Alice - American Anthropologist, 1986 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study relates female contributions to a variety of social variables. The author divides responses to high female contribution to subsistence into two categories: adaptive (i.e. increased exogamy, polygyny, and bridewealth) and attitudinal (i.e. increased valuation of girls and premarital permissiveness). It is proposed that where women contribute more, “they are perceived less as objects for male sexual and reproductive needs and more as a person in their own right” (149).

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