Found 973 Documents across 98 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. Effects of male power and status on polygyny, extramarital sex, and parental investmentRaj, Vrishica - The Human Voyage: Undergraduate Research in Biological Anthropology, 2018 - 2 Hypotheses

    The present research inquires into the effects, if any, that male status and power have on extramarital sex, parental investment, and polygyny. Using sexual selection theory, the hypothesis is that males in higher positions of power and status are more likely to engage in extramarital sexual activities and be in polygynous relationships was supported. There was no support for an association between male extramarital sex and parental investment.

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  2. Male and female age organizations and secret societies in AfricaEricksen, Karen P. - Behavior Science Research, 1989 - 7 Hypotheses

    The author explicitly defines and provides code for male and female age organizations and secret societies in Africa, as well as their significant sociopolitical roles within society. The author conducts preliminary analysis using the codes to explore characteristics and regional patterns of such organizations and societies. The analysis is compared to existing studies in order to assess the code and better understand cross-cultural patterns and variances. The author identifies the usefulness of the code beyond Africa, and discusses avenues for future research. No explicit hypotheses were tested, but Ericksen includes some descriptive generalizations.

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  3. Sex differences in sports across 50 societiesDeaner, Robert. O - Cross-Cultural Research, 2013 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article examines sex differences in sports and games of strategy and chance. Results indicated large differences in participation by gender, especially for combat and hunting sports and in patriarchal societies. The possible cross-cultural universality of this trend is discussed.

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  4. Population, warfare, and the male supremacist complexDivale, William Tulio - American Anthropologist, 1976 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study focuses on the factors associated with the development and persistence of an ideology of male supremacy. Authors identify several realms of culture that show a clear male preference and suggest that warfare is the most significant cause of the male supremacy complex in preindustrial societies. Authors hypothesize that warfare will be positively related to female infanticide. Results support this hypothesis. Another hypothesis relating diet to warfare and infanticide is provided, but not tested.

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  5. Female status and cultural evolution: a study in ethnographer biasDivale, William Tulio - Behavior Science Research, 1976 - 1 Hypotheses

    Considers the effect of data quality and gender of ethnographer on the relationship between female status and cultural complexity. Suggest that data quality controls clarify the nature of the relationship.

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  6. The division of labor by sex and other gender-related variables: an exploratory studyBroude, Gwen J. - Cross-Cultural Research, 1990 - 7 Hypotheses

    Drawing on various theories regarding the sexual division of labor, Broude examines the relationship between task differentiation by sex and gender-related behaviors/customs.

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  7. Sex differences in the ease of socialization: an analysis of the efficiency of child training processes in preindustrial societiesWelch, Michael R. - The Journal of Social Psychology, 1981 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines differences in the ease of socialization for male and female children in preindustrial societies. Results support the hypothesis that the socialization of females is accomplished more easily than the socialization of males.

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  8. A holocultural analysis of old ageGlascock, Anthony P. - Comparative Social Research, 1980 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study provides a cross-cultural examination of the definitions of old age. Further research on these definitions and their implications is suggested.

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  9. Evolutionary ecology of human pair-bonds: cross-cultural tests of alternative hypothesesQuinlan, Robert J. - Cross-Cultural Research, 2007 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study tests three hypotheses on the evolution of the human pair-bond: male-provisioning, male mating competition, and the defense of offspring from other males. Findings indicate that male provisioning and mating competition are factors in the development of the pair-bond. Additional findings indicate that alloparentling, polygyny, and equal contribution to subsistence by each sex contribute to the security of the pair-bond.

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  10. Significance of the father for the son's masculine identityKitahara, Michio - Cross-Cultural Research, 1975 - 9 Hypotheses

    The significance of the son's insufficient contact with his father during infancy in regard to circumcision and segregation is examined. This article suggests that it is not the long postpartum sexual taboo but the separation of each co-wife that is instrumental in bringing about circumcision and segregation. Expands on Kitahara 1974.

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