Found 775 Documents across 78 Pages (0.038 seconds)
  1. Sex differences in the ease of socialization: an analysis of the efficiency of child training processes in preindustrial societiesWelch, Michael R. - The Journal of Social Psychology, 1981 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines differences in the ease of socialization for male and female children in preindustrial societies. Results support the hypothesis that the socialization of females is accomplished more easily than the socialization of males.

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  2. Sex differences in socialization anxietyWelch, Michael R. - The Journal of Social Psychology, 1979 - 7 Hypotheses

    Authors look for associations between the gender of children and several dimensions of socialization anxiety.

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  3. Childhood socialization differences in african and nonafrican societiesWelch, Michael R. - The Journal of Social Psychology, 1978 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study compares child socialization emphases in African and non-African societies. Results show that differences in child socialization are neglibible.

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  4. Relationships among selected child-rearing variables in a cross-cultural sample of 110 societiesZern, David - Developmental Psychology, 1984 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article examines child-training through children's display of individualistic orientations (self-reliance, achievement, and general independence) and/or group orientations (responsibility, nurturance, and obedience). Five sub-categories measure whether each orientation is linked to a child's experience of general pressure or performance anxiety/conflict. Together, these orientations their sub-categories total 30 variables that were correlated; differences in gender were also examined. Results indicate that child-rearing pressure to act one way predicts pressure to act in other ways, and this pattern of interaction between variables did not vary by gender.

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  5. Environmental vs. technological effects on childhood socialization processes: a cross-cultural studyWelch, Michael R. - International Journal of Sociology of the Family, 1980 - 1 Hypotheses

    The author expands on the findings of Barry, Bacon, and Child (1959), hypothesizing that type of environment is an intervening variable in the relationship between subsistence type and child training. A multiple classification analysis is used.

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  6. Nuclear family universals: fact and faith in the acceptance of an ideaHendrix, Lewellyn - Journal of Comparative Family Studies, 1975 - 4 Hypotheses

    This paper examines Murdock's (1949) definitions and data pertaining to the universal functions of the nuclear family. The author asserts that Murdocks definitions and data are faulty and finds that Murdock's claims regarding the universality of nuclear families are unsupported.

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  7. Cross-cultural patterns in the training of children: an evolutionary perspectiveLow, Bobbi S. - Journal of Comparative Psychology, 1989 - 6 Hypotheses

    This article offers a behavioral ecological approach to the study of child training practicies. Gender differences in child training are discussed in light of evolutionary theory, and the author suggests training is likely tailored to promote the reproductive success of each gender. Generally, boys are trained to be more aggressive, stronger, and self-reliant; girls are trained to be more hard-working, responsible, obedient, and sexually restrained. Gender differences in child training frequently vary with degree of polygyny and/or social stratification in a society.

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  8. Social structural expansion, economic diversification, and concentration of emphases in childhood socialization: a preliminary test of value transmission hypothesesWelch, Michael R. - Ethos, 1984 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article investigates the relationship between economic type and socialization of children. The author focuses on the concentration of value emphases in childhood socialization--that is, whether children are instilled with several different value orientations rather than just one or two. Value concentration is examined alongside subsistence technology and economic diversification; attention is also paid to gender differences.

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  9. The use of discipline in socialization: its relationship to cognitive complexityZern, David - Genetic Psychology Monographs, 1981 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines the relationship between disciplining children and cognitive complexity. 1027 relationships between individual variable pairs are tested, and a significant portion support an association between pressure for obedience to social norms and complexity. Additional socialization variables are considered; gender and age differences are also discussed.

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  10. Child training and game involvementRoberts, John M. - Ethnology, 1962 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study builds on a previous study of games by Roberts, Arth and Bush (1959) and offers a conflict interpretation of game involvement. Several significant relationships are observed between game type and child training variables.

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