Found 717 Documents across 72 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. Instrumental and expressive socialization: a false dichotomyHendrix, Lewellyn - Sex Roles, 1985 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study reanalyzes the work of Barry, Bacon and Child (1957) on sex differences in child socialization. The authors use factor analysis to determine if the results of the original study are consistent with results yielded using modern methods and computer analysis. Authors find that there is no one general dimension of male-female difference in socialization and that the conclusions of Barry, Bacon, and Child have little meaning.

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  2. Environmental vs. technological effects on childhood socialization processes: a cross-cultural studyWelch, Michael R. - International Journal of Sociology of the Family, 1980 - 1 Hypotheses

    The author expands on the findings of Barry, Bacon, and Child (1959), hypothesizing that type of environment is an intervening variable in the relationship between subsistence type and child training. A multiple classification analysis is used.

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  3. Illegitimacy and social structures: cross-cultural perspectives on nonmarital birthHendrix, Lewellyn - , 1996 - 13 Hypotheses

    This book investigates sanctions for nonmarital conceptions or birth. The author conducts cross-cultural tests for hypotheses derived from a variety of theories. Results do not support one theory over another, but suggest that variables such as sociocultural complexity, family structure, descent, fraternal interest groups, sexual inequality, and child-parent relationships all affect the consequences of illegitimacy.

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  4. Household structure and socialization practicesMunroe, Ruth H. - Journal of Social Psychology, 1980 - 1 Hypotheses

    An earlier study (Minturn & Lambert 1964) found a nonsignificant association between multifamily households and social permisiveness. This article re-tests that association using Barry et al.'s ratings for child socialization practices, finding that having several families in one house tends to decrease socialization pressure on children.

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  5. The psychological integration of culture: a cross-cultural study of Hopi type initiation ritesGranzberg, Gary - The Journal of Social Psychology, 1973 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article explores the hypothesis that certain initiation and child-rearing patterns are integrated by virtue of the fact that the child rearing creates a specific kind of problem personality that the initiation counteracts. Early indulgence followed by compliance child training is explored in the Hopi culture, and similar patterns are examined in a sample of societies.

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  6. Quality and equality in marriage: a cross-cultural viewHendrix, Lewellyn - Cross-Cultural Research, 1997 - 9 Hypotheses

    This article presents a review of the scholarly work relating to marital quality. Cross-cultural testing of various predictors of marital qualtiy are presented singlely as well as multiple regression analyses.

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  7. Nuclear family universals: fact and faith in the acceptance of an ideaHendrix, Lewellyn - Journal of Comparative Family Studies, 1975 - 4 Hypotheses

    This paper examines Murdock's (1949) definitions and data pertaining to the universal functions of the nuclear family. The author asserts that Murdocks definitions and data are faulty and finds that Murdock's claims regarding the universality of nuclear families are unsupported.

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  8. Spousal interdependence, female power, and divorce: A cross-cultural examinationHendrix, Lewellyn - Journal of Comparative Family Studies, 1995 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study focuses on the relationship between women's power/status and divorce. Tests of gender variables with measures of divorce highlights the importance of sexual equality in divorce frequency as well as the effect of division of labor on divorce.

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  9. Women’s status and mode of production: a cross-cultural testHendrix, Lewellyn - Journal of Women in Culture and Society, 1988 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article presents a materialist approach to the study of women's status. The authors test a Marxist-feminist theory which situates women's status as the end effect in a causal chain that begins with the mode of production and is mediated by the extent to which women control production. Results point to separate, rather than confounding, effects of these two factors on the status of women.

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  10. The relationship of certain group-oriented and individualistically oriented child-rearing dimensions to cultural complexity in a cross-cultural sampleZern, David - Genetic Psychology Monographs, 1983 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article tests the relationship between child-training variables and cultural complexity. Attention is paid to different types of socialization pressure (group-oriented versus individual-oriented; the degree of anxiety created by the pressure). Findings suggest that group-oriented socialization promotes societal complexity, but individual-oriented socialization and pressure-induced anxiety do not.

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