Found 674 Documents across 68 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. Path consistency in directed graphs and social structureSweetser, Dorrian Apple - American Journal of Sociology, 1967 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study uses "rules of combination" to describe internal order in social groups. The author examines kinship structure, and specifically the relationship of the mother's brother towards the son. Results support the hypothesis.

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  2. Applying Heider's theory of cognitive balance to Claude Levi-StraussCarroll, Michael P. - Sociometry, 1973 - 2 Hypotheses

    Heider's theory of cognitive balance is applied to Levi-Strauss' discussion of the sentiment relations existing among four kin roles.

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  3. Avoidance, social affiliation, and the incest tabooSweetser, Dorrian Apple - Ethnology, 1966 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article examines parent-in-law avoidance in non-industrial societies. The author suggests that in-law avoidance is associated with characteristics of kinship structure, such as lineality, residence and family type. A psychological interpretation is also offered. Results support hypotheses relating to kinship structure.

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  4. Same-sex competition and sexual conflict expressed through witchcraft accusationsPeacey, Sarah - Scientific Reports, 2022 - 11 Hypotheses

    In this study, the authors analyze relationships between witchcraft accusations and the gender of the accused. They find that men are most often accused of witchcraft in their sample of 54 Bantu or Bantoid societies, and are particularly more likely to be accused of witchcraft by unrelated or blood-related individuals or in disputes over wealth or prestige. On the other hand, women are more likely to be accused of witchcraft in affinal relationships, particularly husbands and co-wives, and in situations related to fertility or relationships. Elderly women were also more likely to be accused of witchcraft than elderly men. The authors also examined outcomes of witchcraft accusations, finding that 81% of cases resulted in a negative outcome for the accused. They suggest that competition underlies accusations of witchcraft.

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  5. Solidarity, stratification and sentiment: the unilateral cross-cousin marriage according to the theories of levi-strauss, leach, and homans and schneiderBerting, J. - Bijdragen tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde, 1960 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article tests differing theories of why a man's marriage of his mother's brother's daughter is often encouraged while marriage of the father's sister's daughter is discouraged. Maintenance of relationships between bride-givers and bride takers is considered, as are the role of childhood sentiments in choosing a spouse.

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  6. Male dominance and female autonomy: domestic authority in matrilineal societiesSchlegel, Alice - , 1972 - 15 Hypotheses

    This book examines male and female power in various kinship configurations. Variables for male dominance and female autonomy are associated with various political and social variables, such as political complexity and co-wife jealousy. Several hypotheses are supported.

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  7. Drunkenness and culture stress: a holocultural testSchaefer, James Michael - Transcultural Psychiatry, 1974 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study tests cross-cultural hypotheses that predict the variables that lead to drunkenness. Previous hypotheses are reviewed and retested and control tests attempt to ascertain the adequacy of the cross-cultural method.

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  8. Aloofness and intimacy of husbands and wives: a cross-cultural studyWhiting, John W.M. - Ethos, 1975 - 5 Hypotheses

    This study examines husband-wife relationships, specifically rooming and sleeping arrangements, as they relate to variables such as infant care, subsistence, residence, and cultural complexity. Several hypotheses are tested and all are supported.

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  9. The family in cross-cultural perspectiveStephens, William N. - , 1963 - 4 Hypotheses

    This book is a comprehensive cross-cultural survey of family customs described by anthropologists. It asks about the range and frequency of variation, how the customs compare with American families, and the associations between traits. The author includes many qualitative descriptions in describing variation.

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  10. Role differentiation in the nuclear family: a comparative studyZelditch, Morris - Family, Socialization and Interaction Process, 1955 - 4 Hypotheses

    In a volume devoted to the understanding of the American family, the author, using data from 56 societies, tests a couple of hypotheses about role differentiation in the nuclear family.

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