Found 657 Documents across 66 Pages (0.009 seconds)
  1. Trance and possession: studies of charismatic influenceSwanson, Guy E. - Review of Religious Research, 1978 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study examines correlates of trance and possession in pre-industrial societies. Results suggest that the presence of trance/possession is associated with subsistence, number of jurisdictional levels, and community decision-making.

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  2. A cross-cultural study of beliefs in out-of-the-body experiences, waking and sleepingSheils, Dean - Journal of the Society for Psychical Research, 1978 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article provides a descriptive account of the prevalence and variation in out-of-body experiences (OOBEs) worldwide. The author suggests that contemporary social science explanations for OOBEs (i.e. social control, crisis, and dream theories) are inadequate. Certain beliefs regarding OOBEs, such as whether they occur and the conditions for their occurrence, were shown to be relatively similar cross-culturally.

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  3. Altered states of consciousness within a general evolutionary perspective: a holocultural analysisBourguignon, Erika - Cross-Cultural Research, 1977 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article investigates a cultural patterning of altered states of consciousness. The authors use an ordinal variable for a society's trance type; its four levels are 1) trance, 2) trance and possession trance, 3) possession trance, and 4) neither type. Results suggest that trance type is associated with measures of societal complexity and subsistence economy. Regional differences and the effects of diffusion are also examined.

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  4. Societal correlates of possession trance in sub-saharan africaGreenbaum, Lenora - Religion, Altered States of Consciousness, and Social Change, 1973 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study examines correlates of possession trance among cultures in sub-Saharan Africa. Several variables were tested (including community organization, marriage form, family form, and settlement pattern) but only a few were related to possession trance. Results indicate that the presence of slavery, stratification, and role and structure differentiation are significantly associated with possession trance.

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  5. A preliminary analysis of the relationship between altered states of consciousness, healing, and social structureShaara, Lila - American Anthropologist, 1992 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article tests hypotheses relating altered states of consciousness, healing and social structure variables such as gender stratification, female participation, and kinship structure. Results did not support an association between ASCs and gender stratification, but did suggest distinct correlates of possession versus trance healing.

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  6. Trance states: a theoretical model and cross-cultural analysisWinkelman, Michael James - Ethos, 1986 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article offers a detailed analysis of neurophysiological processes involved in altered states of consciousness. Cross-cultural hypotheses concerning altered states of consciousness are tested.

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  7. PossessionBourguignon, Erika - , 1976 - 5 Hypotheses

    This book investigates possession and possession-trance. While the author focuses on a case study of Haiti, there are also a handful of cross cultural tests performed. Results suggest that societal complexity is associated with belief in possession-trance, rather than possession alone.

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  8. Effects of Evolution, Ecology, and Economy on Human Diet: Insights from Hunter-Gatherers and Other Small-Scale SocietiesPontzer, Herman - Annual Review of Nutrition, 2021 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study, primarily a review on the evolution of the human diet, also includes a small study on the distribution of meat-eating and its relationship with climate and cultural factors, namely subsistence type. The authors find that societies with subsistence strategies that prioritize fishing, hunting, or pastoralism also tend to consume more animal products, whereas those that focus on agriculture have more plant-based diets. The authors argue that these small-scale societies have a healthier approach to diet than industrialized societies regardless of their subsistence type or meat consumption.

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  9. Hunter-gatherers have less famine than agriculturalistsBerbesque, J. Colette - Biology Letters, 2014 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study tests the common belief that hunter-gatherers suffer more famine than other subsistence types. Controlling for habitat quality, authors examine the relationship between famine and subsistence type and find that hunter-gatherers actually experience significantly less famine than other subsistence types.

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  10. Resource stress predicts changes in religious belief and increases in sharing behaviorSkoggard, Ian - Human Nature, 2020 - 6 Hypotheses

    Using multilevel modeling and society-level regressions as well as mediational path modeling, the authors test two alternative models that consider how resource stress, religious beliefs, and beyond-household food and labor sharing may be related. The resource stress model suggests that high resource stress has two consequences: 1) that such stress may lead to beliefs that gods and spirits are associated with weather and 2) that resource stress leads to more sharing. Furthermore, this model suggests that the relationship between resource stress and sharing is not mediated by god beliefs. The alternative model considered, the moralizing high god model, suggests that resource stress will lead to more sharing but it is mediated by moralizing high gods. Before testing the path models, the authors first consider the relationships between resource stress and beliefs about high gods, superior gods, and minor spirits involvement with weather. Since the results were strongest for high gods, the path models focused on high gods. The results largely support the resource stress model rather than the high god moralizing model.

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