Found 921 Documents across 93 Pages (0.008 seconds)
  1. Managing infidelity: a cross-cultural perspectiveJankowiak, William - Ethnology, 2002 - 5 Hypotheses

    This study focuses on spousal responses to extramarital affairs cross-culturally. Results suggest that men and women are equally concerned with the sexual activities of their spouses, however, tactics used in response to infidelity vary by gender. Results also show a relationship between social complexity and responses to infidelity.

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  2. A cross-cultural study of the effects of environmental unpredictability on aggression in folktalesCohen, Alex - American Anthropologist, 1990 - 2 Hypotheses

    Using a psychoanalytic-materialist approach, the author examines the possible effects of environmental unpredictability on the prevalence of unprovoked aggression by characters in folktales.

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  3. Extra-marital affairs: a reconsideration of the meaning and universality of the "double standard"Jankowiak, William - World Cultures, 2002 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study examines the variation in responses to sexual infidelity and the effect of social complexity and descent on responses to infidelity. Results suggest significant relationships between social complexity, descent, and responses to infidelity

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  4. National motives and psychogenic death ratesLester, David - Science, 1968 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study investigates possible relationships between the need for achievement and power (as measured in folktales) with rates of suicide and homicide in preindustrial societies. Analysis suggests that homicide is not associated with either the need for achievement or power, but suicide is positively associated with the need for power.

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  5. A cross-cultural study of folk-tale content and drinkingMcClelland, David C. - The Drinking Man, 1972 - 8 Hypotheses

    This book chapter tests new and pre-existing theories (Horton, Field, Bacon et al.) for the cause of variation in drinking across cultures. Folktale content is used to test psychological variables more directly than has been done previously. Folktale content is analyzed programmatically with an acknowledged error level of up to one-third. Results lend support to Field's 1962 theory that loose social organization facilitates drinking.

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  6. Power and inhibition: a revision of the magical potency theoryWanner, Eric - The drinking man, 1972 - 3 Hypotheses

    This book chapter (4) follows up suggestions from a previous chapter (3) by McClelland et.al. that in non-solidary societies heavy drinking is associated with conflict about personal power and alcohol provides a way of acting out impulses aimed at impacting others. Support was found for this theory using an analysis of words in folktales.

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  7. Using drug foods to capture and enhance labor performance: a cross-cultural perspectiveJankowiak, William - Current Anthropology, 1996 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study examines the relationship between drug foods and colonialism in relation to labor and trade. Relationships were found between political complexity, subsistence type, and the use of drug foods as labor and trade enhancers and inducers.

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  8. Strategy in games and folk talesRoberts, John M. - Journal of Social Psychology, 1963 - 5 Hypotheses

    This study investigates the strategic mode of competition in both games of strategy and folk talkes. Various significant relationships between games of strategy, folktales, social complexity, and child rearing variables are observed.

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  9. A cross-cultural perspective on romantic loveJankowiak, William - Ethnology, 1992 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study negates the hypothesis that romantic love is unique to Euro-American culture and provides evidence of romantic love in the majority of cultures sampled.

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  10. Cultural complexity and demography: The case of folktakesAcerbi, Alberto - Evolution and Human Behavior, 2017 - 3 Hypotheses

    Acerbi, Kendal, and Tehrani examine the relationship between population size and cultural complexity as measured by a non-technological cultural domain: folktales. Three measures of complexity for folktales are analyzed, 1) number of tale types, 2) number of narrative motifs, and 3) number of traits in variants of two international folktales. Findings suggest that the relationship between cultural complexity and population may depend on the domain, as different domains vary in cultural maintenance and transmission.

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