Found 958 Documents across 96 Pages (0.012 seconds)
  1. Social structureMurdock, George Peter - , 1949 - 41 Hypotheses

    This book is a comprehensive analysis of many aspects of social structure including family, clan, community, kinship terminology, social organization, regulation of sex, incest taboos, and sexual choice.

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  2. The mother-in-law tabooPans, A.E.M.J. - Ethnology, 1998 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article examines mother-in-law avoidance, theorizing it is "a device for distinguishing the son-in-law/mother-in-law relationship from the husband-wife relationship in societies where these relationships tend to be similar as far as their economic aspect is concerned” (71). The conditions that may give rise to economic interaction between son-in-law and mother-in-law, such as matrilocal residence, are also discussed.

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  3. Avoidance, social affiliation, and the incest tabooSweetser, Dorrian Apple - Ethnology, 1966 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article examines parent-in-law avoidance in non-industrial societies. The author suggests that in-law avoidance is associated with characteristics of kinship structure, such as lineality, residence and family type. A psychological interpretation is also offered. Results support hypotheses relating to kinship structure.

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  4. Cross-sex patterns of kin behaviorMurdock, George Peter - Ethnology, 1971 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study re-examines patterns of cross-sex kin relationships using new ethnographic data. The author looks specifically at cross-sex kin relationship in relation to marriage rules.

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  5. Kin-avoidanceStephens, William N. - The Oedipus Complex: Cross-Cultural Evidence, 1962 - 3 Hypotheses

    The authors test the male Oedipus complex hypothesis with a prediction suggesting that the scale of kin-avoidance is related to "a phobic attitude towards incest" (129).

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  6. Levirate and sororate and the terminological classification of uncles, aunts, and siblings' childrenPans, A.E.M.J. - Ethnology, 1989 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study re-examines the hypothesis of Sapir (1916) regarding the relationship between levirate and sororate and kinship terminology. The author critiques Murdock’s (1947) work on this topic and performs his own analysis for four hypotheses. Results suggest that “the levirate and sororate are significantly correlated to the occurrence of bifurcate merging terminology and step-bifurcate collateral terminology” (352). Exceptions to this finding are also discussed.

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  7. Cross-sex patterns of kin behavior: a commentGoody, Jack - Behavior Science Research, 1974 - 4 Hypotheses

    This paper examines the behavior between close kin and affines of the opposite sex. The authors "point to certain differences between continental areas that are related to specific social factors, including the structure of descent groups and the nature of marriage arrangements."

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  8. Being in charge: older women and their younger female kinBrown, Judith K. - Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology, 1994 - 4 Hypotheses

    A study of the relationship between older women and their young female kin. Relationships between women's relationships with their mother-in-laws and subsistence contribution, residence, descent, and food preparation are examined. Findings offer significant support for patterns in the relationship between older women and younger female kin.

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  9. On a method of investigating the development of institutions: applied to laws of marriage and descentTylor, Edward B. - Readings in Cross-Cultural Methodology, 1961 - 5 Hypotheses

    This paper, the first cross-cultural study published in 1889 (reprinted here) asserts that tabulation and classification are important methodological tools to study anthropological subjects. The author investigates the development of institutions of marriage and descent, tabulating data on residence, descent, kinship terminology, wife capture, and exogamy.

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  10. Privacy, love and in-law avoidanceCozby, Paul C. - American Psychological Association. 79th Annual Convention, Proceedings., 1971 - 2 Hypotheses

    Authors explore the relationship between privacy among newlywed couples and romantic love as a basis for marriage. Authors also consider the relationship between newlywed privacy and kin avoidence. Both associations are found to be statistically significant.

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