Found 654 Documents across 66 Pages (0.013 seconds)
  1. Adolescence: an anthropological inquirySchlegel, Alice - , 1991 - 81 Hypotheses

    This book discusses the characteristics of adolescence cross-culturally and examines the differences in the adolescent experience for males and females. Several relationships are tested in order to gain an understanding of cross-cultural patterns in adolescence.

    Related DocumentsCite
  2. Population growth, society, and culture: an inventory of cross-culturally tested causal hypothesesSipes, Richard G. - , 1980 - 51 Hypotheses

    This book examines population growth rate and its correlates by testing 274 hypotheses (derived from multiple theories) with an 18-society sample. Forty-one of these hypotheses were significant at the .05 level, leading the author to accept these relationships as reflective of the real world. The 274 hypotheses are grouped into 51 broader hypotheses, and marked by (*) where relationships are significant as designated by the author or by significance p < 0.05.

    Related DocumentsCite
  3. Gender inequality in childhood: toward a life course perspectiveBaunach, Dawn Michelle - Gender Issues, 2001 - 12 Hypotheses

    This article builds upon gender inequality theory to examine childhood gender inequality in preindustrial societies. Multivariate and cluster analysis are used.

    Related DocumentsCite
  4. The sexual division of labor and the value of childrenBradley, Candice - Behavior Science Research, 1984 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article examines the adult sexual division of labor to determine what predicts the value of children cross-culturally.Using log-linear analysis, the author finds that adult sexual division of labor in animal husbandry is associated with the value of children.

    Related DocumentsCite
  5. A new cross-cultural study of drunkennessField, Peter B. - Society, Culture and Drinking Patterns, 1962 - 11 Hypotheses

    This book chapter builds on Horton's 1943 psychoanalytical study of drunkenness. The author tests an overall theory that drunkenness, which facilitates personal and uninhibited interactions, is more acceptable, and therefore prevalent, in societies with loose, rather than rigid, social relationships. Indicators of social rigidity, such as strict socialization or male dominance through patrilocality, are tested for relationships to drunkenness.

    Related DocumentsCite
  6. Starvation and famine: cross-cultural codes and some hypothesis testsDirks, Robert - Cross-Cultural Research, 1993 - 8 Hypotheses

    "This article provides a set of codes that rate the starvation and famine experiences of societies in the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample. The codes are used to test several theoretical generalizations regarding the underlying causes of famine." Results indicate that seasonal starvation and direct entitlements are the strongest predictors of famine.

    Related DocumentsCite
  7. Six cultural customs associated with gentle affection for childrenBarry III, Herbert - Acceptance: The Essence of Peace, 2008 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study tests for the cultural customs that are associated with gentle affection for children. It is asserted that identification of the associated customs may indicate the social conditions that are constant with gentle affection for children.

    Related DocumentsCite
  8. They love me, they love me not: a worldwide study of the effects of parental acceptance and rejection.Rohner, Ronald P. - , 1975 - 18 Hypotheses

    The purpose of this book is to introduce a conceptual and methodological perspective called the "universalist approach," and to use this approach in exploring the pancultural antecedents and affects of parental acceptance-rejection of children,

    Related DocumentsCite
  9. The social structure of grandparenthoodApple, Dorrian - American Anthropologist, 1956 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study reports on a structural analysis which is suggested to confirm and expand upon Nadel's (1951) hypothesis that friendly equality between grandparents and grandchildren appears only with certain patterns of authority in the family.

    Related DocumentsCite
  10. Naming and identity: a cross-cultural study of personal naming practicesAlford, Richard - , 1987 - 14 Hypotheses

    This book examines naming practices cross-culturally. The author posits that naming practices help to both reflect and create conceptions of personal identity. Several correlations between name meanings and practices and various sociocultural variables are presented.

    Related DocumentsCite