Found 1109 Documents across 111 Pages (0.009 seconds)
  1. Internal and external conflict and violence: cross-cultural evidence and a new analysisRoss, Marc Howard - Journal of Conflict Resolution, 1985 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article suggests a general theory of conflict and violence that may help explain the conditions under which internal conflict co-occur or are differentiated.

    Related DocumentsCite
  2. Warless and warlike hunter-gatherers: a comparisonKelly, Robert L. - Warless Societies and the Origin of War, 2000 - 7 Hypotheses

    This book examines the characteristics of warlike and warless foraging societies, as well as the transitional stages that occur when a society becomes warlike. Several predicted correlates of warfare frequency are supported.

    Related DocumentsCite
  3. "Blood feuds": cross-cultural variations in kin group vengeanceEricksen, Karen Paige - Cross-Cultural Research, 1992 - 4 Hypotheses

    Feuding and other responses to malfeasance are examined cross-culturally. The geographic distribution of responses are presented and odds ratios/logistic regression models are employed in analyzing the effect of socio-economic, historical and ecological variables on responses to malfeasance. Codes are included.

    Related DocumentsCite
  4. Archaeology of slavery from cross-cultural perspectiveHrnčíř, Václav - Cross-Cultural Research, 2017 - 8 Hypotheses

    The authors examine correlations between slavery and variables that can potentially be detected archaeologically. The authors do not test specific hypotheses, but aim to explore the variables in a broader sense. As such, the authors use a grounded theory approach to data analysis in order to examine trends that emerge from the data itself.

    Related DocumentsCite
  5. On the emergence of large-scale human social integration and its antecedents in primatesGrueter, Cyril C. - Structure and Dynamics: eJournal of Anthropological and Related Sciences, 2014 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article investigates whether external warfare, intercommunity trade, and female exogamy lead to more amicable intercommunity relationships. Intercommunity amicability is considered a historical facilitator of the large-scale integration of human groups. The absence of internal warfare is used as a measure for intercommunity amicability.

    Related DocumentsCite
  6. Internal war: a cross-cultural studyOtterbein, Keith F. - American Anthropologist, 1968 - 9 Hypotheses

    This study examines how social structure, political organization, and intersocietal relations may affect the incidence of internal warfare (between culturally similar political communities). Results show that in uncentralized political systems, fraternal interest groups and unauthorized raiding parties may increase the incidence of internal war.

    Related DocumentsCite
  7. A global analysis of cultural tightness in non-industrial societiesJackson, Joshua Conrad - Proceedings of the Royal Society, 2020 - 12 Hypotheses

    This article builds on previous cross-country and cross-state research into Tightness-Looseness (TL) theory, which proposes relationships between the incidence of ecological threat and cultural tightness, as well as tightness’ downstream effects on belief in a moralizing high god, inter-group contact and authoritarian leadership. To evaluate the generalizability of TL theory beyond complex cultures, the authors test these relationships among 86 nonindustrial societies from the ethnographic record. A structural equation model is presented of the results for nonindustrial societies; it is generally in accord with previous findings from more complex societies. Because the nonindustrial sample is more variable, they also look at relationships between societal complexity and kinship heterogeneity, aspects that vary in nonindustrial societies.

    Related DocumentsCite
  8. Warfare regulation: a cross-cultural test of hypotheses among tribal peoplesTefft, Stanton K. - Behavior Science Research, 1974 - 8 Hypotheses

    This paper tests "theories which suggest that there are causal-functional relationships between the dependent variables peacemaking and peace stability on the one hand and certain independent variables, such as political complexity, warrior class, warfare objectives, cultural homology and intersocietal ties, on the other hand." Significant relationships were found between the last three independent variables.

    Related DocumentsCite
  9. Cultural evolution and conflict resolutionShiels, Dean - Wisconsin Sociologist, 1986 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines why conflict emerges and how societies resolve it. The authors posit that increasing societal scale and differentiation create more potential for conflict but also more complex forms of conflict resolution. Analysis supports this theory, showing that measures of cultural complexity are positively associated with legal mechanisms for conflict resolution.

    Related DocumentsCite
  10. Differences between otherwise similar communities reveal cultural linkages with higher government levelsBarry III, Herbert - Social Evolution & History, 2009 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines pairwise differences between similar cultures in order to minimize cultural variation within the SCCS and reveal possible correlates of cultural complexity. Results suggest that one measure of complexity (government above the community level) is significantly associated with several other variables.

    Related DocumentsCite