Found 711 Documents across 72 Pages (0.01 seconds)
  1. Cousin termsGoody, Jack - Southwestern Journal of Anthropology, 1970 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article tests hypotheses related to kinship terms, cousin marriage, and descent rules. Omaha, Crow, Eskimo, and Iroquois systems are each significantly associated with different kinship rules. Material from Northern Ghana is also considered.

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  2. Sideways or downwards? Lateral and vertical succession, inheritance and descent in africa and eurasiaGoody, Jack - Man, n.s., 1970 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article examines direction of succession and inheritance as they relate to culture area and kinship system. Several hypotheses are presented and all are supported.

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  3. Cross-sex patterns of kin behavior: a commentGoody, Jack - Behavior Science Research, 1974 - 4 Hypotheses

    This paper examines the behavior between close kin and affines of the opposite sex. The authors "point to certain differences between continental areas that are related to specific social factors, including the structure of descent groups and the nature of marriage arrangements."

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  4. Adoption in cross-cultural perspectiveGoody, Jack - Comparative Studies in Society and History, 1969 - 1 Hypotheses

    The goal of this paper is to inquire into the reasons behind the uneven distribution of adoption by linking it with the other broad differences between the major Eurasian and African societies.

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  5. Bridewealth and dowry in Africa and EurasiaGoody, Jack - Bridewealth and Dowry, 1973 - 1 Hypotheses

    This chapter considers several forms of wealth transmission at marriage. The relationships between descent rules and incidence of bridewealth, dowry, and gift exchange are examined and several patterns emerge from empirical analysis.

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  6. Social structureMurdock, George Peter - , 1949 - 41 Hypotheses

    This book is a comprehensive analysis of many aspects of social structure including family, clan, community, kinship terminology, social organization, regulation of sex, incest taboos, and sexual choice.

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  7. Polygyny, economy and the role of womenGoody, Jack - The Character of Kinship, 1973 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article discusses the relationship between plural marriage and women's position in the economy. Comparisons are made between this relationship in various locations and cultures. The article concludes that female farming is not sufficient as an explanation.

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  8. Matrilineal descent in cross-cultural perspectiveAberle, David F. - Matrilineal Kinship, 1961 - 15 Hypotheses

    This chapter explores and tests some propositions about matrilineal societies. Supplementary to that discussion, the author also explores the problems of method associated with the use of coded data on large samples of cultures.

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  9. Patterns of sibling terminologyMurdock, George Peter - Ethnology, 1968 - 2 Hypotheses

    This paper examines the distribution and diffusion of the seven patterns of sibling classifaction given by the author. The author then studies the association between descent and sibling terminology.

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  10. Cross-Cultural Correlates of the Ownership of Private Property: Two Samples of Murdock's DataRudmin, Floyd Webster - Journal of Socio-Economics, 1995 - 2 Hypotheses

    The present study aims to evaluate correlations of private property from two of Murdock's datasets, one of 147 societies (1981) and the other of 312 societies (1967). Altogether the author tested 146 variables coded by Murdock against variables regarding the ownership of land and of movables drawn from Murdock (1967), Simmons (1937), and Swanson (1960). In total, there were 51 statistically significant correlations between private property ownership and other variables. Additionally, the author summarizes the results from this article and the two that preceded it stating that throughout all of the correlations he ran, the practice of agriculture, the use of cereal grains, and the presence of castes and classes were the only variables that predicted private property in all of the datasets that were utilized.

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