Found 855 Documents across 86 Pages (0.043 seconds)
  1. Gendered SpaceSpain, Daphne - , 1992 - 9 Hypotheses

    In this study, the author examines how gender-segregated space may affect the status of women in nonindustrial societies. Specifically, the author examines predictors of women's status in kinship, inheritance, and labor. The author argues that the gendered partitioning of space contributes to the subordination of women cross-culturally because these practices limit women's access to information which men use to gain status.

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  2. The status of women in preindustrial societiesWhyte, Martin King - , 1978 - 23 Hypotheses

    This book is concerned with explaining variation in the status of women. The author, after measuring over 50 aspects of status, first concludes that status is not a unitary concept. Therefore the author looks at 10 different domains of status. Many traditional explanations are not supported; most support is found for the influence of social complexity which generally lowers female status.

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  3. Sex, power, and resources: ecological and social correlates of sex differencesLow, Bobbi S. - International Journal of Contemporary Sociology, 1990 - 15 Hypotheses

    This article focuses on ecological correlates of sexual division in the control of resources. The author tests several ecological theories put forth by others. Sex coalitions are examined in humans, and sexual dimorphism in resource acquisition and control is discussed.

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  4. Gender inequality in childhood: toward a life course perspectiveBaunach, Dawn Michelle - Gender Issues, 2001 - 12 Hypotheses

    This article builds upon gender inequality theory to examine childhood gender inequality in preindustrial societies. Multivariate and cluster analysis are used.

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  5. Cultural dimensions: a factor analysis of textor's a cross-cultural summaryStewart, Robert A. C. - Behavior Science Notes, 1972 - 12 Hypotheses

    This article uses factor analysis to identify the key variables underlying the many cross-cultural associations reported by Textor (1967). Twelve factors are identified.

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  6. Male dominance and female autonomy: domestic authority in matrilineal societiesSchlegel, Alice - , 1972 - 15 Hypotheses

    This book examines male and female power in various kinship configurations. Variables for male dominance and female autonomy are associated with various political and social variables, such as political complexity and co-wife jealousy. Several hypotheses are supported.

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  7. Cross-cultural correlates of the ownership of private property: Zelman's gender data revisitedRudmin, Floyd Webster - Cross-Cultural Research, 1996 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article analyzes the predictors of private property ownership with an aim to replicate existing correlations using data from the dissertation of Zelman (1974).

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  8. Quality and equality in marriage: a cross-cultural viewHendrix, Lewellyn - Cross-Cultural Research, 1997 - 9 Hypotheses

    This article presents a review of the scholarly work relating to marital quality. Cross-cultural testing of various predictors of marital qualtiy are presented singlely as well as multiple regression analyses.

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  9. Women’s status and mode of production: a cross-cultural testHendrix, Lewellyn - Journal of Women in Culture and Society, 1988 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article presents a materialist approach to the study of women's status. The authors test a Marxist-feminist theory which situates women's status as the end effect in a causal chain that begins with the mode of production and is mediated by the extent to which women control production. Results point to separate, rather than confounding, effects of these two factors on the status of women.

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  10. A re-examination of the cross-cultural principles of task segregation and sex role differentiation in the familyCrano, Joel - American Sociological Review, 1975 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines Parsons' and Bales' proposition that a universal feature of social structure is gender sex role specialization of tasks. Results suggest that women contribute substantially to the subsistence economy across many domains, casting doubt on such universality.

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