Found 733 Documents across 74 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. Violence in the ethnographic record: results of cross-cultural research on war and aggressionEmber, Carol R. - Troubled Times: Violence and Warfare in the Past, 1997 - 7 Hypotheses

    This paper reviews the results of the author's cross-cultural studies of war and aggression and their implications for prehistory.

    Related DocumentsCite
  2. Hunter-gatherers have less famine than agriculturalistsBerbesque, J. Colette - Biology Letters, 2014 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study tests the common belief that hunter-gatherers suffer more famine than other subsistence types. Controlling for habitat quality, authors examine the relationship between famine and subsistence type and find that hunter-gatherers actually experience significantly less famine than other subsistence types.

    Related DocumentsCite
  3. Birth and 'bonding' in non-industrial societiesLozoff, Betsy - Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, 1983 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study examines the presence of parent-infant body contact at birth in non-industrial societies and its effects on subsequent infant care. The results show that immediate parent-infant contact is not common among most societies and does not have a significant effect on the quality of infant care.

    Related DocumentsCite
  4. The role of the father: an anthropological perspectiveKatz, Mary Maxwell - The Role of the Father in Child Development, 1981 - 1 Hypotheses

    This chapter examines the relationship between male parental behavior and influences of species, ecological and social factors. The authors first present a cross-phylogenetic perspective on paternal differences between species, then offer two quantitative studies: a comparative study of non-western human societies that correlates father-infant proximity with socioecological factors and another about father-infant proximity among the !Kung.

    Related DocumentsCite
  5. Relationships between subsistence and age at weaning in "preindustrial" societiesSellen, Daniel W. - Human Nature, 2001 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study tests the weaning food availability hypothesis, that both the introduction of foods other than breastmilk and the cessation of breastfeeding will vary by society's subsistence type. This hypothesis has implications for demography, as accelerated weaning can lead to increases in both mothers' fertility (due to decreased birth intervals) and infant mortality (due to the presence of pathogens in new foods).

    Related DocumentsCite
  6. Human lactation, pair-bonds, and alloparents: a cross-cultural analysisQuinlan, Robert J. - Human Nature, 2008 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines the relationship between pairbonds and lactation, specifically the relationship between pairbond stability, alloparenting, and cross-cultural trends in breastfeeding. Findings show that both conjugal stability and availability of alloparental care are associated with age at weaning.

    Related DocumentsCite
  7. Relations among infants and juveniles in comparative perspectiveKonner, Melvin J. - Social Science Information, 1976 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article investigates peer relations in infancy, both in primates and in preindustrial human societies. Data from these populations shows a strong tendency toward a multi-age composition of play groups rather than solely peer-aged play groups for infants. Patterns in child care across societies of different subsistence types are empirically examined.

    Related DocumentsCite
  8. Effects of infant-carrying practices on rhythm in musicAyres, Barbara - Ethos, 1973 - 1 Hypotheses

    This paper hypothesizes that cross-cultural variation in rhythm is related to variation in infant carrying practices. Suggestions are made regarding the psychological origin of rhythm as well as the function and importance of music in human experience.

    Related DocumentsCite
  9. Starvation and famine: cross-cultural codes and some hypothesis testsDirks, Robert - Cross-Cultural Research, 1993 - 8 Hypotheses

    "This article provides a set of codes that rate the starvation and famine experiences of societies in the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample. The codes are used to test several theoretical generalizations regarding the underlying causes of famine." Results indicate that seasonal starvation and direct entitlements are the strongest predictors of famine.

    Related DocumentsCite
  10. Trance and possession: studies of charismatic influenceSwanson, Guy E. - Review of Religious Research, 1978 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study examines correlates of trance and possession in pre-industrial societies. Results suggest that the presence of trance/possession is associated with subsistence, number of jurisdictional levels, and community decision-making.

    Related DocumentsCite